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I am getting segmentation fault in this code but i cant figure out why. I know a segmentation fault happens when a pointer is NULL, or when it points to a random memory address.

 q = p;
        while(q -> link != NULL){
            q = q -> link;
        }
        t = new data;
        t -> city = cityName;
        t -> latitude = lat;
        t -> longitude = lon;
        q -> link = t;

This is the error am actually getting in console:

line 33: 2219 Segmentation fault    sh "${SHFILE}"
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3  
@Carlos: why remove all that code ? As I understand it from the answer you accepted, some of it was relevant. – Raphaël Saint-Pierre Mar 16 '10 at 17:55
up vote 6 down vote accepted

In the else clause in Database::add, you do not set t->link = NULL, so it is uninitialized.

You should add a constructor for data that initializes its members, or use the value-initializing new to ensure that everything is initialized correctly:

t = new data(); // note the parentheses
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It's possible that it's because when you're adding a new node to the end of the list:

else{
    q = p;
    while(q -> link != NULL){
        q = q -> link;
    }
    t = new data;
    t -> city = cityName;
    t -> latitude = lat;
    t -> longitude = lon;
    q -> link = t;
}

you're not setting t->link = NULL;.

share|improve this answer

You are not setting Database::data::link to NULL in Database::add:

    t = new data;
    t -> city = cityName;
    t -> latitude = lat;
    t -> longitude = lon;
    t -> link = NULL;

EDIT: I would add a constructor for Database::data to initialize the various members. Something like:

class Database {
    struct data {
        data(): latitude(0.0), longitude(0.0), link(NULL) {}
        ...
    };
    ...
 };

Then you do not have uninitialized memory to worry about.

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Compile with -g as an argument to g++

Then from command line "gdb (binary name)"

inside gdb, "run" and it will execute until the fault

type "bt" to see a stack trace

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1  
sorry for not spoonfeeding you what you needed. i'll remember not to answer your questions in the future – Mike Mar 16 '10 at 17:26
2  
What tells you he's the one who downvoted you? (No, it wasn't me. ;)) – MetalMikester Mar 16 '10 at 17:27
5  
I downvoted because A. The user appears to be a beginner and probably is not aware of a "stack trace". B. The user is not running from a commandline and probably has no experience with gdb. C. Nothing says the user has GDB installed. D. You spent no time looking at the code and answering the question, you simply put in a response that is canned, etc. – Billy ONeal Mar 16 '10 at 17:30
1  
Maybe that's what you think, but I'm looking at the question and it says, "What's wrong with this code". Your answer does not answer that question, and you assume the user knows too much given what he's posted. For example, the user is using netbeans. You don't even know he knows what g++ is much less gdb. Therefore I downvoted. – Billy ONeal Mar 16 '10 at 17:45
2  
+1: Debuggers are especially useful when dealing with memory-related issues -> good answer. – gorsky Mar 16 '10 at 18:22

There may be other issues but here's one:

else{
    q = p;
    while(q -> link != NULL){
        q = q -> link;
    }
    t = new data;
    t -> city = cityName;
    t -> latitude = lat;
    t -> longitude = lon;
    q -> link = t;
}

You never set t->link to null and therefore it's filled with junk.

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You need to assign t's link to NULL:

else{
    q = p;
    while(q -> link != NULL){
        q = q -> link;
    }
    t = new data;
    t -> city = cityName;
    t -> latitude = lat;
    t -> longitude = lon;
    t -> link = NULL; // add this
    q -> link = t;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Heh, we all answered at the same time. – Jeremy Bell Mar 16 '10 at 17:37

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