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I have a huge text file, which follows the structure:

SET
TAG1
...
...
SET
...
SET
TAG2
...
...
SET
...
...

I would like to extract for a specific TAG, (i.e. TAG54) its individual "substructure", which would be

SET
TAG54
...
...
SET

Each substructure, for a given TAG_i contains always:

first line:SET second line:TAG_i (in this case TAG54) an arbitrary number of lines last line:SET

I wonder what would be the best way to do this, whether in bash or python, so for a given TAG, one can "extract" this substructure.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Not a very good solution, but you can use a my bad regex in python: /TAG\d+?(.+?)SET/gsm There is a better way to do newlines, but the regex tool I was using doesn't like them. – Davis Mar 16 '10 at 18:09

Here's a Python approach: you pass in the open file handle as the first argument, the tag number as second argument, and get back as the result a list of the relevant lines (including newline characters), or an empty line if the tag is not found in the file:

def lookfor(f, tagnum):
  tag = 'TAG%s\n' % tagnum
  for line in f:
    if line == tag:
       break
  else: # file finished, tag not found
    return []
  result = ['SET\n', tag]
  for line in f:
    result.append(line)
    if line == 'SET\n':
        break
  return result

This should be reasonably well-performing. If you want other forms of arguments and/or results, it shouldn't be hard to tweak accordingly, of course.

share|improve this answer

If your system's grep supports -P for perl regexp:

grep -P 'SET\nTAG54\n[.\n]*\nSET' file.txt
share|improve this answer
    
hi, it does no work. can you tell me what each part does? thanks a lot – flow Mar 17 '10 at 11:55
    
grep is a search tool; the -P option makes grep use a perl-type regexp (your system may not support -P); 'SET\nTAG54\n[.\n]*\nSET' is the regexp to match: SET followed by a newline, followed by TAG54 and a newline, then some arbitrary number (*) of arbitrary characters and/or newlines ([.\n]), a newline, and SET; file.txt is the name of the file to search. – Isaac Mar 17 '10 at 13:05

gawk:

BEGIN {
  state=0
}

state==0 && $0=="TAG54" {
  print "SET"
  state=1
}

state==1 {
  print
}

state==1 && $0=="SET" {
  exit
}
share|improve this answer
csplit -f tags input.txt '%^TAG54$%-1' '/^SET$/+1' '%.*%' '{*}'
share|improve this answer
$ awk -vRS="SET" '/TAG54/{print RT$0RT}' file
SET
TAG54
...
...
SET

if you are doing it with shell scripting, pass your shell variable to awk using -v. eg

#!/bin/bash
read -r -p "what's your tag? " tag
awk -vRS="SET" -vt="$tag" '$0~tag{print RT$0RT}' file
share|improve this answer
    
hi, your approach is really nice and simple! I forgot to mention that I also need the lines wiht "SET" at the beginning and end of the file, but I will do by myself. thanks – flow Mar 17 '10 at 11:53

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