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I noticed that you can't throw an exception in a destructor. So my question is what should I do if destructor fails.

Another question is, under what situation a destructor might fail?

Thanks so much

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5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Ignore the error.

A destructor might "fail" if for example the class wraps some kind of output, and the destructor flushes and closes that output. Writing data might fail. Your options then are to terminate the program, or to catch the exception, ignore the error, and return. Usually the right design is to ignore it.

In my example, the class should also have a "close_and_flush" function, which users can call prior to object destruction if they want to know whether it succeeded or not. If the user of your class doesn't care whether the operation failed, then neither do you, and you can safely suppress the exception.

Users can then write code like this:

{
    OutputObject OO;
    write some stuff to OO, might throw;
    do more things, might throw;
    try {
        OO.flush_and_close();
    } catch (OutputException &e) {
        log what went wrong;
        maybe rethrow;
    }
}

Or this:

try {
    OutputObject OO;
    write some stuff to OO, might throw;
    do more things, might throw;
    OO.flush_and_close();
} catch (AnyOldException &e) {
    log what went wrong;
    maybe rethrow;
}

Either way, the only time the object will be destroyed without explicit flushing by the user, is if something else throws an exception and the object is destroyed during stack unwinding. So they already know that their operation has failed, and if necessary they can roll back transactions or whatever else they have to do in response to failure.

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+1: It's probably a core leak and you can't do much about it. –  S.Lott Mar 16 '10 at 18:23

Design your classes that their d'tors can't fail by design. If something in the d'tor could throw an exception, catch it within the d'tor body and swallow it (or handle it however you like it, but don't rethrow it).

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A destructor should be written so that it cannot fail. Freeing resources should be the only things you do in the destructor itself. Use separate methods for further "de-initialization" procedures.

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But this defeats RAII? Wouldn't this make it more likely that "de-initialization" is skipped? –  UncleBens Mar 16 '10 at 20:23
    
I agree with UncleBens. This defeats RAII. Using exception safe code is the way to go, and for destructors (among others), the code must be nothrow/nofail. –  paercebal Jun 3 '12 at 9:38

I disagree with the idea that destructors should be "designed so they cannot fail" - of course they can fail. For example, a call to fclose() in a destructor could fail. Now the question is what to do about it? As I see it, there are two options:

  • Ignore it. This has the virtue of simplicity, but you will never know that the failure happened, which can mean hiding bugs.

  • Log it. The problem with this is that there is no guarantee that writing the log won't also fail, or trigger some other problem.

If this leaves you no wiser, then it's the same for me! Basically, there is no perfect solution. You need to choose from the two options above depending on circumstances. One way of deciding is to think "If this were C code (which doesn't have destructors) what would I do?" - if you would ignore the problem in C, ignore it in C++ too,

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Neil - my response mentions using separate method for more advanced clean up....fclose() would fall under that. That way the method can choose how to handle the exception instead of the d'tor itself. Things can of course fail, I just prefer cleanup methods for that rather than sticking all that code in the d'tor itself. –  Holograham Mar 16 '10 at 18:32
    
Funny you mention fclose(). Even if it fails, the stream will be disassociated from the file, so nothing useful can be done anyway except logging. –  Nemanja Trifunovic Mar 16 '10 at 18:38

Destructors must not throw!

RAII is built upon this, so throwing from a destructor will open the possibility of RAII breaking on you.

And this is not limited to C++. You usually don't want a failure on disposal to break the execution of your program, whatever the language or framework.

But I wanna throw!!!!

If you believe your object should throw upon disposal of resource, then you should do it manualy:

class MyObject
{
    public :
       // etc.
       ~MyObject()
       {
          try
          {
             this->dispose() ;
          }
          catch(...) { /* log the problem, or whatever, but DON'T THROW */ }
       }

       void dispose()
       {
          if(this->isAlreadyDisposed == false)
          {
             this->isAlreadyDisposed = true ;

             // dispose the acquired resource          
          }
       }
} ;

This way, by default, your object will work correctly with RAII. But on the occasion where dispose failure should be known to you, then you call manually the dispose method and handle the potential failure.

The exact code of the dispose method depends on what result you want (e.g. Should dispose be multithread-safe or not, should an object that failed on dispose be considered "already disposed" or not, etc.).

Isn't there another way to signal the error?

Of course, there is, but they are grounded on global resources anyway.

For example, you could log the failure in the console, or in a text file.

Another would be to set some global variable, but this is usually the dirtiest trick you can use with C++. Another would be to call some kind of handler, but again, you can't do much in a generic handler who won't know what to do with your error.

In one case, I wrote a constructor who took a reference to a boolean upon construction. Something like:

class MyObject
{
    bool & isOk ;

    public :
       // etc.
       MyObject(bool & p_isOk) : isOk(p_isOk) {}

       ~MyObject()
       {
          // dispose of the ressource
          // If failure, set isOk to false ;
       }
} ;

Which can be used as:

void foo()
{
   bool isOk = true ;

   // etc.

   {
      MyObject o(isOk) ;
      // etc.
   }


   if(isOk == false)
   {
      // Oops...
   }
}

But this kind of code should be exceptional. I remember I imagined it, but can't remember if it was used at all (I used a variation for a timer, though...).

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