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I have a matrix in numpy, that is a NxM ndarray that looks like the following one:

[
  [ 0, 5, 11, 22, 0, 0, 11, 22], 
  [ 1, 4, 11, 20, 0, 4, 11, 20], 
  [ 1, 6, 11, 22, 0, 1, 11, 22], 
  [ 4, 7, 12, 21, 0, 4, 12, 21], 
  [ 5, 7, 12, 22, 0, 7, 12, 22], 
  [ 5, 7, 12, 22, 0, 5, 12, 22]
]

I would like to sort it by rows putting the zeros in each row first without changing the order of the other elements along the row.

My desired output is the following:

[
  [ 0, 0, 0, 5, 11, 22, 11, 22], 
  [ 0, 1, 4, 11, 20, 4, 11, 20], 
  [ 0, 1, 6, 11, 22, 1, 11, 22], 
  [ 0, 4, 7, 12, 21, 4, 12, 21], 
  [ 0, 5, 7, 12, 22, 7, 12, 22], 
  [ 0, 5, 7, 12, 22, 5, 12, 22]
]

For a matter of efficiency I am required to do it using numpy (so switching to Python's regular nested lists and doing calculations on them is discouraged). The faster the code, the better.

How could I do that?

Best, Andrea

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is a loop over rows allowed?

>>> a
array([[ 0,  5, 11, 22,  0,  0, 11, 22],
       [ 1,  4, 11, 20,  0,  4, 11, 20],
       [ 1,  6, 11, 22,  0,  1, 11, 22],
       [ 4,  7, 12, 21,  0,  4, 12, 21],
       [ 5,  7, 12, 22,  0,  7, 12, 22],
       [ 5,  7, 12, 22,  0,  5, 12, 22]])
>>> for row in a:
...     row[:] = np.r_[row[row == 0], row[row != 0]]
...     
>>> a
array([[ 0,  0,  0,  5, 11, 22, 11, 22],
       [ 0,  1,  4, 11, 20,  4, 11, 20],
       [ 0,  1,  6, 11, 22,  1, 11, 22],
       [ 0,  4,  7, 12, 21,  4, 12, 21],
       [ 0,  5,  7, 12, 22,  7, 12, 22],
       [ 0,  5,  7, 12, 22,  5, 12, 22]])
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I was looking for a solution with no for loops but still, this is simple and will work just fine. – Andrea Aquino Jul 4 '14 at 12:02

This approach gets a binary array of where your array is zero and non-zero, then gets the sort index for that, then applies that to the original array.

You'll need an array as big as your to-be-sorted array to hold the index, but since it's all numpy operations it might be faster than looping.

ind = (a>0).astype(int)
ind = ind.argsort(axis=1)
a[np.arange(ind.shape[0])[:,None], ind]

output:

>>> a
array([[ 0,  0,  0,  5, 11, 22, 11, 22],
       [ 0,  1,  4, 11, 20,  4, 11, 20],
       [ 0,  1,  6, 11, 22,  1, 11, 22],
       [ 0,  4,  7, 12, 21,  4, 12, 21],
       [ 0,  5,  7, 12, 22,  7, 12, 22],
       [ 0,  5,  7, 12, 22,  5, 12, 22]])
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you dabhaid, unfortunately it seems this approach is up to 5 times slower than a regular loop over the rows. – Andrea Aquino Jul 4 '14 at 13:11
    
That's very interesting - thanks for providing the comparison, sorry for being too lazy to do it myself :) – dabhaid Jul 4 '14 at 13:16

maybe not the most efficient since it loops on the line, but maybe a good starting point:

import numpy as np

a = np.array([[ 0,  5, 11, 22,  0,  0, 11, 22],
             [ 1,  4, 11, 20,  0,  4, 11, 20],
             [ 1,  6, 11, 22,  0,  1, 11, 22],
             [ 4,  7, 12, 21,  0,  4, 12, 21],
             [ 5,  7, 12, 22,  0,  7, 12, 22],
             [ 5,  7, 12, 22,  0,  5, 12, 22]])

size = a.shape[1]

for i, line in enumerate(a):
    nz = np.nonzero(a[i][:])[0]
    z = np.zeros(size - nz.shape[0])
    a[i][:] = np.concatenate((z,a[i][:][np.nonzero(a[i][:])]))

For each line in a, you find the nonzero indices and prepend some zeros to match the size.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, this is a very clean solution, I preferred the other since it is slightly faster on bigger matrixes (10000x10000) and it is more compact. But I really appreciated your help! – Andrea Aquino Jul 4 '14 at 12:04
1  
You should vote for it then – Nobi Jul 4 '14 at 13:14
    
When I asked the question I was not able to upvote the answers but now I am, thank you for pointing it out :) – Andrea Aquino Jul 4 '14 at 13:46
    
thanks for the support : ) – toine Jul 4 '14 at 13:48

It is possible to get rid of all the Python looping, building a boolean mask with the help of np.tile and np.repeat, although you will have to time it on some larger example to see if it is worth the extra complexity:

rows, cols = a.shape
mask = a != 0
nonzeros_per_row = mask.sum(axis=1)
repeats = np.column_stack((cols-nonzeros_per_row, nonzeros_per_row)).ravel()
new_mask = np.repeat(np.tile([False, True], rows), repeats).reshape(rows, cols)
out = np.zeros_like(a)
out[new_mask] = a[mask]

>>> a
array([[ 0,  5, 11, 22,  0,  0, 11, 22],
       [ 1,  4, 11, 20,  0,  4, 11, 20],
       [ 1,  6, 11, 22,  0,  1, 11, 22],
       [ 4,  7, 12, 21,  0,  4, 12, 21],
       [ 5,  7, 12, 22,  0,  7, 12, 22],
       [ 5,  7, 12, 22,  0,  5, 12, 22]])
>>> out
array([[ 0,  0,  0,  5, 11, 22, 11, 22],
       [ 0,  1,  4, 11, 20,  4, 11, 20],
       [ 0,  1,  6, 11, 22,  1, 11, 22],
       [ 0,  4,  7, 12, 21,  4, 12, 21],
       [ 0,  5,  7, 12, 22,  7, 12, 22],
       [ 0,  5,  7, 12, 22,  5, 12, 22]])
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, anyway this seems to be much slower than the other solutions, it takes almost 8 seconds on my machine when I run it on a 10000x10000 matrix. – Andrea Aquino Jul 7 '14 at 7:59

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