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I have allocated a vector on the heap using new:

std::vector<t*> *vec = new std::vector<t*>;

This vector contains class objects, of a class "t", these class objects are created using new

t *ptr1 = new t();
t *ptr2 = new t();
t *ptr3 = new t();
t *ptr4 = new t();

Now when i delete the vector, it's expected that all these objects which are added to it should get destroyed as well, i mean:

std::vector<t*> *vec = new std::vector<t*>;
 vec->push_back(ptr1);
 vec->push_back(ptr2);
 vec->push_back(ptr3);
 vec->push_back(ptr4);

memory pointed by ptr1, ptr2, ptr3, ptr4 should get freed as well.

But Valgrind shows this as a leak !!! Is Valgrind faulty?

==15634==
==15634== HEAP SUMMARY:
==15634==     in use at exit: 48 bytes in 8 blocks
==15634==   total heap usage: 12 allocs, 4 frees, 128 bytes allocated
==15634==
==15634== LEAK SUMMARY:
==15634==    definitely lost: 32 bytes in 4 blocks
==15634==    indirectly lost: 16 bytes in 4 blocks
==15634==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==15634==    still reachable: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==15634==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==15634== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==15634==
==15634== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==15634== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 2 from 2)

Here is the full program for everyone's reference:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class t
{
int *ptr;
public:
  t()
  {
    cout << "t's constructor" << endl;
    ptr = new int(50);
  }
 ~t()
  {
    cout << "t's destructor called" << endl;
    delete ptr;
  }

  void func()
  {
     cout << "This is class t's function" << endl;
  }

};

//void func(int *ptr, t* ptr1)
void func(t* ptr1)
{
 //delete ptr;
 delete ptr1;
}

int main( )
{
 //int *ptr;

 t *ptr1 = new t();
 t *ptr2 = new t();
 t *ptr3 = new t();
 t *ptr4 = new t();
 //ptr =new int(20);
 //func(ptr, ptr1);
 //func(ptr1);

 std::vector<t*> *vec = new std::vector<t*>;
 vec->push_back(ptr1);
 vec->push_back(ptr2);
 vec->push_back(ptr3);
 vec->push_back(ptr4);

 delete vec;
 //delete ptr1; ===============> Are these required? Shouldn't delete vec take care?
// delete ptr2;
 //delete ptr3;
 //delete ptr4;

}
share|improve this question
2  
C++ is not java, avoid new whenever possible, the language allows you to use types without dynamic allocation. –  Mgetz Jul 4 at 12:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Now when i delete the vector, it's expected that all these objects which are added to it should get destroyed as well

They are. You added pointers, and the pointers will be destroyed.

That says nothing about the things the pointers point to, though. In short, your assumption is wrong.

Your options:

  • delete each pointee before destroying the vector
  • use smart pointers
  • stop using pointers! stop using dynamic allocation!
    std::vector<t> should be fine in the majority of cases.
share|improve this answer
2  
@Ely perhaps you should not be passing the vector around. Perhaps you should be passing a const reference around. –  Mgetz Jul 4 at 13:02
3  
@Ely return a vector created in a sub-function is not expensive because of move semantics and Return value optimization. –  TNA Jul 4 at 13:21
1  
@Ely: "I always prefer pointers inside my vectors." Well I'm sorry to sound rude but that is very bad practice and sounds like inexperience. You should prefer pass-by-value and you can get it to be perfectly efficient. Storing pointers in containers creates a mess that isn't worth it at all. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 4 at 14:32
2  
I like to std::move it std::move it. I like to std::move it std::move it. –  Puppy Jul 4 at 14:33
1  
Unfortunately, some objects object, (sorry), to being moved. –  Martin James Jul 4 at 14:38

When the verctor is destroyed, it destroyed only the memory allocated by the vector. That mean, verctor needs internal structures to keep the t* that you inserted. That memory is definitly deleted by the desctor destructor. But the values that you have “newed” are not freed by the vector.

You are the responsible person for deleting those memory.

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