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I'm tailing logs and they output \n instead of newlines.

I thought I'd pipe the tail to awk and do a simple replace, however I cannot seem to escape the newline in the regex. Here I'm demonstrating my problem with cat instead of tail:

// test.txt
John\nDoe
Sara\nConnor

cat test.txt | awk -F'\\n' '{ print $1 "\n" $2 }'

Desired output:

John
Doe
Sara
Connor

Actual output:

John\nDoe
        <-  there is a newline here
Sara\nConnor
        <-  there is a newline here     

So it looks like \\n does not match the \n between the first and last names in test.txt but instead the newline at the end of each line.

It looks like \\n is not the right way of escaping in the terminal right? This way of escaping works fine in e.g. Sublime Text:

regex working in ST3

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about this?

$ cat file
John\nDoe
Sara\nConnor

$ awk '{gsub(/\\n/,"\n")}1' file
John
Doe
Sara
Connor
share|improve this answer
    
Why you are using awk? sed seems more appropriate for editing files. –  hek2mgl Jul 4 '14 at 12:41
1  
op tagged the awk tag. –  Avinash Raj Jul 4 '14 at 12:42
1  
You could change "\n" with RS and get awk '{gsub(/\\n/,RS)}1' –  Jotne Jul 4 '14 at 12:42
    
@AvinashRaj Ok, this is a valid reason. :) I think, although in most situations you can use both sed or awk, sed is for such editing tasks. awk is more for analytical tasks. Also you should never forget grep (not in this question) –  hek2mgl Jul 4 '14 at 12:49
    
Maybe I should not have tagged this awk but I did, and this answer works. However the sed seems better for this task? The problem is sed behaves weird on Mac OSX, see @DarkDust and @Ed Morton answers. –  Cotten Jul 4 '14 at 13:28

This will work with any sed on any system as it is THE portable way to use newlines in sed:

$ sed 's/\\n/\
/' file
John
Doe
Sara
Connor

If it is possible for you input to contain a line like foo\\nbar and the \\ is intended to be an escaped backslash then you cannot use a simple substitution approach like you've asked for.

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1  
Yes, you are right. Could you explain why GNU sed --posix behaves differently than BSD sed (which also claims to be POSIX compatible). Is the problem caused by GNU sed --posix not working properly or by BSD sed not being POSIX compatible? –  hek2mgl Jul 4 '14 at 13:25
    
Sorry, no, I'd need to read the POSIX spec for sed to figure that one out and life's too short... I will say , though, that BSD awk is broken in some ways (e.g. parsing of unparenthesized ternary expressions in print statements) so maybe their sed is too? –  Ed Morton Jul 4 '14 at 13:28
1  
I would need too, thought maybe you know it already... :) thx . +1 for the solution –  hek2mgl Jul 4 '14 at 13:29

Using GNU's sed, the solution is pretty simple as @hek2mgl already answered (and that IMHO is the way it should work everywhere, but unfortunately doesn't).

But it's bit tricky when doing it on Mac OS X and other *BSD UNIXes.

The best way looks like this:

sed 's/\\n/\'$'\n''/g' <<< 'ABC\n123'

Then of course there's still AWK, @AvinashRaj has the correct answer if you'd like to user that.

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1  
Err, no. It's the other way around: GNU's sed is extending POSIX sed; that's why it needs --posix in the first place. –  DarkDust Jul 4 '14 at 13:20
1  
I think your syntax is a little off - it should be sed 's/\\n/\'$'\n''/g' to insert a literal newline (generated by $'\n') in the script before sed processes it. I'm not sure what the shell is making of the standalone $ between the 2 halves of your sed script ('s/\\n/\' and '\n/g'). –  Ed Morton Jul 4 '14 at 13:43
2  
So, let's actually look at the POSIX standard: the problem is that the standard does not specify whether second part of s (the "replacement") shall interpret \n or not. Since it's not a BRE and the "\" has special meaning here I'd say it shouldn't. The BSD sed's POSIX notes state that historic versions didn't and discarded the "\" (see point 16). So both are POSIX compatible since the standard doesn't specify the behavior. –  DarkDust Jul 4 '14 at 13:45
2  
Yeah, what's happening is that the shell is evaluating $'\n/g' before sed tries to execute the script and that expands to a literal newline followed by /g so it "works" by co-incidence. It would not work with different characters after the / that the shell would expand - /g just happens to be harmless. –  Ed Morton Jul 4 '14 at 13:51
1  
@EdMorton: Thanks, have edited my answer. –  DarkDust Jul 4 '14 at 13:55

I would use sed:

sed 's/\\n/\n/g' file
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That does not work for me: sed 's/\\n/\n/g' test.txt output: line1: JohnnDoe line2: SaranConnor –  Cotten Jul 4 '14 at 12:44
    
It should. Try: sed 's/\\n/\n/g' <<< 'ABC\n123' –  hek2mgl Jul 4 '14 at 12:46
    
sed 's/\\n/\n/g' <<< 'ABC\n123' gives me ABCn123. Is this a plattform issue? I'm on OS X using zsh –  Cotten Jul 4 '14 at 12:50
    
sed --posix 's/\\n/\n/g' <<< 'ABC\n123' works. Srry, use Linux. I'm not the OSX support I'm tired of supporting this and will never get why a Mac should be used for hacking. (its not against you personally) –  hek2mgl Jul 4 '14 at 12:55
1  
BSD's sed doesn't have a --posix, it is POSIX conform already. GNU's sed has a lot of (useful) extensions to POSIX that --posix is supposed to disable. I found an answer with a solution that works on all systems (tested on Mac and Linux). –  DarkDust Jul 4 '14 at 13:18

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