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Experimenting some with F# async taught me that I can StartImmediate on the current running thread. This allows me, it seems, to run an async expression which can still pass out control, whenever getting inside of it to some async operation (e.g. do!), to the code outside of the async expression. Please see the simple example below:

open System.Threading

let workThenWait() = async { 
  printfn "async start"
  do! Async.Sleep(1000) 
  printfn "async end"
  }

let demo() = 
  workThenWait() |> Async.StartImmediate
  printfn "main started"
  // here I want to wait to the async expression in case it has passed control
  printfn "main end"

demo()

The result we get is:

async start
main started
main end
async end

On the other hand, if I execute the same async expression (in this case workThenWait) using StartAsTask (inside demo), I can potentially wait on it at the end.

MY QUESTION is:

using the previous example using StartImmediate, can I run on the same thread, but ALSO wait at the end for the async expression in case some async operation (such as do!) is called and passes control forward?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think You need Async.RunSynchronously (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee370262.aspx)

update: Ok, now I understand better what You want, and I was able to achieve this with Async.StartWithContinuations method.

Here's the code:

open System.Threading
let f() =
printfn "main thread: %A" Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
let c1 = 
    async {
            printfn "c1 async thread: %A" Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
            do! Async.Sleep(1000) 
            return "some result"
          }

let continuation s = 
    printfn "continuation thread: %A" Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
    printfn "now the code You want after waiting and the result %s" s

Async.StartWithContinuations( 
    c1, 
    continuation,
    (fun _ -> ()), 
    (fun _ -> ())
    )

printfn "Code that runs during async computation"

Now this is definitely not very readable as the flow of the code is not obvious. I couldn't find any better solution.

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1  
The RunSynchronously will work differently than StartImmediate, in the sense that it will PREVENT async operations, such as do!, to forward control. My inquiry is the scenario where: run async on same thread using StartImmediate ==> in the async expression executing an async operation such as do! ==> forwarding control to the code outside of the async expression ==> BUT, and here is my question, be able to still WAIT for the async expression at the end – TalBeno Jul 4 '14 at 17:21
    
Thanks for the clarification, I've updated the answer. – Grzegorz Sławecki Jul 4 '14 at 19:04
    
This is useful. I knew about StartWithContinuations but did not realize it could be the only possible way to do it. I will wait bit more to see if some guru f# coders can come up with a cleaner more readable version, and close the thread. Thank you Grzegorz Sławecki. – TalBeno Jul 4 '14 at 23:41
    
Thanks! I'm also curious if this can be done in a more readable way. – Grzegorz Sławecki Jul 5 '14 at 9:08

You can do this with Hopac libary:

let workThenWait() = job { 
  printfn "async start"
  do! Hopac.Timer.Global.sleep (TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds 1000.) 
  printfn "async end"
  }

let demo() = 
  let promise = workThenWait() |> Promise.start |> run
  printfn "main started"
  // here I want to wait to the async expression in case it has passed control
  let result = run promise
  printfn "main end"

demo()

Hopac is both more performant and functional than async and is little known compared to how good it is. I highly recommend it.

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