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We subscribe to a database that lets us export our data in csv, Excel or XML format. We have some reports that would be far better going down a page, rather than across, and I'm trying to work out the simplest way for our non technical users to be print a usable report for meetings. I suspect I may be missing something obvious!

e.g. the csv the user exports would have these headings:

title, subtitle, about the project, launch date, key factors to consider, key market

When formatted across an Excel page, the longer text becomes unreadable and doesn't print well. We would ideally want:

title
[title here]

subtitle
[subtitle here]

about the project
[paragraph of text here]

launch date
[date here]

key factors to consider
[paragraph or two here]

etc.

Our users are all on Windows and are not technical. I am aiming for a one or two step process to transform the files once they've been exported. It is likely we'd be dealing with a range of 1 to 100 rows of data to transform, and about 15 fields.

Ideally, users would be able to change the fields exported from the database and still transform them to the tidy report format.

I have considered (i.e. read about and briefly tried) the following options, and would appreciate guidance on anything I've missed, or which approach seems best for me to explore further. In all these cases they have seemed too complex to extend to users and just overly complicated for something that appears like it should be so simple.

  • XML transformation in Word (but it appears the coding of XSLT has an incredibly steep learning curve)

  • Mail Merge in Word from csv - providing users with a Word Template

  • Macros in Excel to move the fields (not sure this would work for multiple records and be easy to print?)

  • Build a tool on our intranet to ingest file and provide printable page(s). PHP or JavaScript?

I have searched for solutions for XML transformation, XML to Word, Excel to Word, Excel to template, CSV to template and similar.

I am hoping I am missing something obvious here and have just failed to think of the right search terms / simple solution. If so, I would really appreciate being shown the right direction. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please don't just ask us to solve the problem for you. Show us how you tried to solve the problem yourself, then show us exactly what the result was, and tell us why you feel it didn't work. See "What Have You Tried?" for an excellent article that you really need to read. –  John Saunders Jul 4 at 17:28
    
Thanks John - I'm familiar with that post and have read it again as requested. I'm sorry I wasn't clear that I have actually tried my proposed solutions and have tried to think of multiple approaches. I have edited my question above in an attempt to be clearer. Thanks. –  Jemima Jul 4 at 21:31
    
Does your database offer the option of applying an XSLT stylesheet to the exported XML, as part of the export process? Or is there any other way you could automate this so it's transparent for your users? –  michael.hor257k Jul 4 at 22:45
    
Unfortunately not. It offers HTML and PDF exports in addition to the ones I've listed, but in both cases the formatting is similar to the CSV so doesn't print well. It is possible to pay for additional development to the database to request a different output format, and that may be the route we go if I'm unable to get a simple transformation working. Thanks. –  Jemima Jul 5 at 7:52
    
Well, I am afraid this is much too vague to give a specific answer (and as a result, also severely off topic for SO). My impression is that the closer you get to the source, the less moving parts you'll have. That would mean either (a) get the DB to spit out exactly what you need to begin with; or (b) append an immediate XSLT transform to the XML output - this could be perhaps achieved by using some sort of middleware to communicate with the DB, or OS-level scripting to initiate the processing of the exported file without user intervention. –  michael.hor257k Jul 5 at 13:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Possible inspiration for you. Given you say your HTML output goes across the page, I would assume that possible it is simply making an HTML table. Let's say your simple HTML looks like this:

<html>
    <body>
        <table>
            <tr>
                <th>header1</th>
                <th>header2</th>
                <th>header3</th>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>body text 1</td>
                <td>body text 2</td>
                <td>body text 3</td>
            </tr>
        </table>
    </body>
</html>

Then a fairly simple conversion would be this:

    <xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">
    <xsl:template match="html">
        <html>
            <xsl:apply-templates/>    
        </html>
    </xsl:template>
        <xsl:template match="body">
            <body>
                <xsl:apply-templates/>    
            </body>
        </xsl:template>
        <xsl:template match="table">
            <xsl:apply-templates/>
        </xsl:template>
        <xsl:template match="tr[not(child::th)]">
            <xsl:apply-templates/>
        </xsl:template>
        <xsl:template match="tr"/>
        <xsl:template match="td">
            <!--Store and retrieve table headers into h1 elements -->
            <xsl:variable name="pos" select="count(preceding-sibling::td) + 1"/>
            <xsl:variable name="headers" select="ancestor::table//th"/>
            <h1>
                <xsl:value-of select="$headers[$pos]"/>
            </h1>
            <p>
                <xsl:value-of select="."/>
            </p>
        </xsl:template>
        <xsl:template match="text()"/>
    </xsl:stylesheet>

To yield this:

<html>
   <body>    
     <h1>header1</h1>
     <p>body text 1</p>             
     <h1>header2</h1>
     <p>body text 2</p>            
     <h1>header3</h1>
     <p>body text 3</p>
  </body>
</html>

Another option would be straight from the CSV to HTML (or XSL FO). I slightly modified the excellent CSV to XML convertor here:

http://andrewjwelch.com/code/xslt/csv/csv-to-xml_v2.html

Using XSL 2.0 and a CSV like this:

"header1","header2","header3"

"body text 1","body text 2","body text 3"

"2 body text 1","2 body text 2","2 body text 3"

You get this:

 <html>
 <body>
  <div>
     <h1>header1</h1>
     <p>body text 1</p>
     <h1>header2</h1>
     <p>body text 2</p>
     <h1>header3</h1>
     <p>body text 3</p>
  </div>
  <div>
     <h1>header1</h1>
     <p>2 body text 1</p>
     <h1>header2</h1>
     <p>2 body text 2</p>
     <h1>header3</h1>
     <p>2 body text 3</p>
  </div>
  </body>
  </html>

The simple modification is here:

    <xsl:template match="/" name="main">
        <xsl:choose>
            <xsl:when test="unparsed-text-available($pathToCSV)">
                <xsl:variable name="csv" select="unparsed-text($pathToCSV)"/>
                <xsl:variable name="lines" select="tokenize($csv, '&#xa;')" as="xs:string+"/>
                <xsl:variable name="elemNames" select="fn:getTokens($lines[1])" as="xs:string+"/>
                <html>
                    <body>
                    <xsl:for-each select="$lines[position() > 1]">
                        <div>
                            <xsl:variable name="lineItems" select="fn:getTokens(.)" as="xs:string+"/>

                            <xsl:for-each select="$elemNames">
                                <xsl:variable name="pos" select="position()"/>
                                <h1>
                                    <xsl:value-of select="."/>
                                </h1>
                                <p>
                                    <xsl:value-of select="$lineItems[$pos]"/>
                                </p>
                            </xsl:for-each>
                        </div>
                    </xsl:for-each>
                    </body>
                </html>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:otherwise>
                <xsl:text>Cannot locate : </xsl:text><xsl:value-of select="$pathToCSV"/>
            </xsl:otherwise>
        </xsl:choose>
    </xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
    
We've been told that the DB can output XML - so it's entirely not clear why you would prefer to choose the less optimal formats as the input to XSLT. Besides, I believe the issue here is how to apply the XSL transformation, rather than what the actual transformation needs to be. –  michael.hor257k Jul 6 at 0:57
    
I did miss that the DB exported XML. And in rereading it , I guess I have missed the whole point of the question. Without knowledge of what the DB is and what interfaces there are and how the users would like to interact, there is no way to answer the question. –  Kevin Brown Jul 6 at 1:20
    
Following the guidance from @KevinBrown I further explored XSL. This appeared quite complex for Word when I initially investigated, but it seems possible to use simple HTML styling and open the document in Word fine. I have created a simple XSL stylesheet and we are trialling users exporting xml from the db, opening the xml in Word 2010, and then navigating to the XSL document on a shared drive to transform the document (Word prompts for this when opening an XML file). It's not very tolerant of user error, but I think may be simple enough for them to do. –  Jemima Jul 7 at 18:02
    
Excellent. You could probably add a menu option in Word with simple VBA code behind that does both. Prompts user to select the XML and then applies the transform. –  Kevin Brown Jul 7 at 18:07

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