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Let's say we have the following function:

foo <- function(x)
{
    line1 <- x
    line2 <- 0
    line3 <- line1 + line2
    return(line3)
}

And that we want to change the second line to be:

    line2 <- 2

How would you do that?

One way is to use

fix(foo)

And change the function.

Another way is to just write the function again.

Is there another way? (Remember, the task was to change just the second line)

What I would like is for some way to represent the function as a vector of strings (well, characters), then change one of it's values, and then turn it into a function again.

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1  
And it's not something you can do by passing a parameter to a function?.. Note that you can also pass functions as parameters. –  Leo Alekseyev Mar 16 '10 at 21:06
2  
Hi Leo - the question is for when I want to change a function someone else did, but inside the code to not have to copy paste the entire function. –  Tal Galili Mar 16 '10 at 21:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Or take a look at the debugging function trace(). It is probably not exactly what you are looking for but it lets you play around with the changes and it has the nice feature that you can always go back to your original function with untrace(). trace() is part of the base package and comes with a nice and thorough help page.

Start by calling as.list (body(foo)) to see all the lines of your code.

as.list(body(foo))
[[1]]
`{`

[[2]]
line1 <- x

[[3]]
line2 <- 0

[[4]]
line3 <- line1 + line2

[[5]]
return(line3)

Then you simply define what to add to your function and where to place it by defining the arguments in trace().

trace (foo, quote(line2 <- 2), at=4)
foo (2)
[1] 4

I said in the beginning that trace() might not be exactly what you are looking for since you didn't really change your third line of code and instead simply reassigned the value to the object line2 in the following, inserted line of code. It gets clearer if you print out the code of your now traced function

body (foo)
{
    line1 <- x
    line2 <- 0
    {
        .doTrace(line2 <- 2, "step 4")
        line3 <- line1 + line2
    }
    return(line3)
}
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1  
+1 for trace... –  Joris Meys Dec 2 '10 at 0:22
> body(foo)[[3]] <- substitute(line2 <- 2)
> foo
function (x) 
{
    line1 <- x
    line2 <- 2
    line3 <- line1 + line2
    return(line3)
}

(The "{" is body(foo)[[1]] and each line is a successive element of the list.)

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3  
Recently I was forced to do similar thing and one thing can be improved: you can go deeper into the list, so for question case body(foo)[[3]][[3]] <- 2 works and substitute is needless. –  Marek Dec 5 '10 at 10:38
    
Thanks. I thought the substitute was needed to keep the mode of the expression as a language item. –  BondedDust Dec 5 '10 at 14:06
    
If you replace whole line then yes, is needed. Generally: classes should match: my way work cause I replace number by number. If I want to replace, say, line2 to myVariable then as.symbol conversion is needed. –  Marek Dec 5 '10 at 16:11

fix is the best way that I know of doing this, although you can also use edit and re-assign it:

foo <- edit(foo)

This is what fix does internally. You might want to do this if you wanted to re-assign your changes to a different name.

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fixInNamespace is like fix, for functions in a package (including those that haven't been exported).

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You can use the 'body' function. This function will return the body of function:

fnx = function(a, b) { return(a^2 + 7*a + 9)}
body(fnx)
# returns the body of the function

So a good way to 'edit' a function is to use 'body' on the left-hand side of an assignment statement:

body(fnx) = expression({a^2 + 11*a + 4})
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