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I am a completely new to bash scripting. I have a txt file (call it geom.txt) which I am using which looks like this:

2
C -0.6165934086165 -0.35599823933468 0.00000000 0.8466
C 0.6165934086165 0.35599823933468 0.00000000 0.8466
lattice_vector 2.46670923 0.00000000 0.00000000
lattice_vector 1.23286602 2.13599798 0.00000000
lattice_vector 0.00000000 0.00000000 40

I would like to write a script which will add a line between lines 1 and 2 to produce an output like:

2

C -0.6165934086165 -0.35599823933468 0.00000000 0.8466
C 0.6165934086165 0.35599823933468 0.00000000 0.8466
lattice_vector 2.46670923 0.00000000 0.00000000
lattice_vector 1.23286602 2.13599798 0.00000000
lattice_vector 0.00000000 0.00000000 40

Furthermore, I want to make this general so that any input file of the previous form will add an empty line between lines 1 and 2. I know this is basic, but I need help! Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using gnu sed:

sed -i.bak '2s/^/\n/' file

Using awk:

awk 'NR==2{print "\n" $0; next}1' file

Using non-gnu sed

sed -i.bak $'2s/^/\\\n/' file

OR else:

eol=$'\n'
sed -i.bak "2s/^/\\$eol/" file

Finally here is pure BASH way:

c=0
while IFS= read -r line; do
    (( c++ == 1 )) && echo
    echo "$line"
done < file
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Ma I know the reason to downvote this please! –  anubhava Jul 4 at 21:49
    
Probably it was for offering more than one solution. :P –  jaypal Jul 4 at 22:26
1  
@jaypal does SO won't allow more than one solution in a single answer? I think he don't want to chat with the OP. So that only he posted sed solutions for differnt types of sed. And +1 for this advance thinking. –  Avinash Raj Jul 5 at 0:12
1  
Thanks @AvinashRaj, buddy Jaypal was saying that in lighter vein, there is no rule that says one can't more than one solution in same answer :) –  anubhava Jul 5 at 3:16
1  
+1, but it's worth noting that looping over lines of an input file in pure shell code is rarely the right solution for performance reasons. That said, [[ $c == 1 ]] && echo ... ... ((c++)) can be simplified to (( c++ == 1 )) && echo. –  mklement0 Jul 5 at 3:29

You can use vim to achieve your goal.

vim -c 1 -c "normal o" -c wq geom.txt 
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Or you can do it in a simple while loop:

let count=0   # set a simple integer to test
:> tmpfile    # create or truncate tmpfile

while read line || test -n "$line"; do
    echo "$line" >> tmpfile   # write each line to tmpfile
    # if this is the first line, add a newline and increment counter
    test "$count" -eq 0 && echo "" >> tmpfile && ((count+=1))
done <"$1"

# when all lines written to tmpfile copy tmpfile to filename given as arg, remove tmpfile
cp tmpfile "$1" && rm -f tmpfile
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There is no advantage to using let with count=0 - with or without let count will be a string variable; if you want to create an integer variable, use declare -i count=0 (which will similarly clarify your intent). Note, though, that thanks to duck typing the type rarely matters. In using ((...)) you've already committed to non-POSIX bash syntax, so why not use [[ ... ]] or ((...)) instead of test? E.g., test "$count" -eq 0 && echo "" >> tmpfile && ((count+=1)) could be simplified to (( count++ == 0 )) && echo >> tmpfile. –  mklement0 Jul 5 at 3:42
    
Also, the general caveat applies that looping over lines of an input file in pure shell code is inadvisable for performance reasons - a utility such as sed or awk is much, much faster. –  mklement0 Jul 5 at 3:45
    
@mklement0 Both points well taken. The value of a variable is evaluated as an arithmetic expression when it is referenced, or when a variable which has been given the integer attribute using declare -i is assigned a value. (man bash) Agreed, whether declared -i or not, it rarely matters. Looping through may have its drawbacks for large files, but for anything less that a few thousand lines, the loop with be as quick, or quicker, than launching an additional app to do it. –  David C. Rankin Jul 5 at 4:10
    
Actually, I just ran a quick test comparing your solution against a sed-based one (sed $'2s/^/\\\n/' file): The sed solution starts to be faster at around 50 lines (of the same length as the sample data in the question, on my OS X 10.9.4 system). Not a scientific test, but it gives you a sense that the threshold is probably lower than you think. While I agree that it won't matter for small files, it's generally worth adding a performance disclaimer when posting a shell-only loop-over-lines solution. Re your specific code: you must double-quote $line in test -n $line. –  mklement0 Jul 5 at 5:16
    
Now that is a good test. I haven't had time to run it, but I suspect the results will vary from say 50 as you found up to a thousand or so depending on disk layout, cache, etc. sed with a single call from the command line has little to slow it down, but if called repeatedly say from within a script, any advantage rapidly disappears. Thanks for taking time to put numbers to it. If I find anything remarkable, I shall drop a note here. –  David C. Rankin Jul 5 at 7:20

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