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I have been trying to solve a problem where i have an array lets say A[]={5,9,11,15}; and 2 variables with values lets say 2 and 10 .i need to find whether any element of the array belong to (2,10] i.e it has value between 2 (excluded) to 10 (inclusive). i could simply turn a loop and search whether the >if(2=A[i])< but this wont work at large value of array size lets say 10^5. and also i tried using modified binary search which returns value of index less than or equal to value to key provide but failed .can anyone provide me with a fast algo for doing this? EDIT: pos here are the number of elements breaaking is the array FLOOR is the function(modified binary)

int Floor(int A[], int l, int r, int key)
{
int m;
while( r - l > 1 )
{
    m = l + (r - l)/2;

    if( A[m] <= key )
        l = m;
    else
        r = m;
}

return l;

}

int Floor(int A[], int size, int key)

{ // Error checking

if( key < A[0] ) return -1; // There is no floor value

return Floor(A, 0, size, key);

}

//

  int ret=Floor(breaaking,pos,mini);

 printf("%d\n",ret);

   printf("mini is %d and maxi is %d",mini,maxi);

    if(pos==0)
{  
    printf("There is no breaking point in the array :) (pos==0)\n");
    printf("Yes\n"); 
}
else if(ret==-1)
 { 
    printf("Mini is smaller than smallest element of breaking\n");

        if(breaaking[0]<maxi)
        { 

             printf("but maxi is greater than smallest element hece it lies between so:\n");
             printf("No\n");
        }
     else {
               printf("even maxi is less than smallest element hence:\n");
               printf("Yes\n");
           }
}
else if(ret==pos-1)
{ 
    printf("mini is either equal to last element of breaker set or greater than it\n");

       if(mini==breaaking[pos-1])
        {
             printf("mini is equal to the last element hence\n");    
                  printf("No\n");}
     else
        { 
        printf("mini is greater than the last element hence:"); 
         printf("Yes\n");
       }
 }
else
 { 
     printf("returned a valid index which is less than or equal to mini which is btw %d\n",ret);

        if(breaaking[ret]==mini)
        {
                 printf("mini was equal to one of the element of array hence\n"); 
                 printf("No\n");
        }
    else
    {  printf("mini is smaller than this element but greater than next element\n");
        if(breaaking[ret+1]<maxi)
             { 
                printf("next element lies between mini and maxi hence:\n")  ;      
                printf("No\n"); 
             }
        else
             {   printf("even maxi is smaller than next element hence\n");
                printf("Yes\n");
             }
     }
`}
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closed as off-topic by Barmar, Deduplicator, lpapp, Shankar Damodaran, karthik Jul 5 at 5:33

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – Barmar, Deduplicator, lpapp, Shankar Damodaran, karthik
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2  
Just make your binary search work. –  Inspired Jul 4 at 22:09
    
Binary search is pretty fast; in what way did your modified BS fail? –  Scott Hunter Jul 4 at 22:10
    
I did it perfectly but it didn't gave me the output i required . somewhere along i failed to properly implement it –  user3806625 Jul 4 at 22:11
    
Do you really want to implement it yourself? Why not use the standard library (look at <algorithm>)? Or is this some weird assignment? –  Boris Jul 4 at 22:12
2  
Sounds like you didn't do it perfectly. –  Andrew_CS Jul 4 at 22:12

1 Answer 1

You can simply use std::lower_bound to return you a range that contains all values. The range will be empty, if there are none.

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <tuple>

template<typename ForwardIterator>
std::pair<ForwardIterator, ForwardIterator>
range_inside(ForwardIterator b, ForwardIterator end, 
                  int lower, int upper) {
  auto it = std::lower_bound(b, end, lower);
  auto it2 = std::upper_bound(it, end, upper);
  return std::make_pair(it, it2);
}

int main()
{
  int arr[] = { 2, 5, 9, 10, 11, 15};
  int *r, *e;
  std::tie(r, e) = range_inside(std::begin(arr), std::end(arr), 2, 10);
  std::for_each(r, e, [] (int& x) { std::cout << x << " "; }); 
  // output: 2 5 9

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
what will x contain if they are no elements in this range –  user3806625 Jul 4 at 22:33
    
r == e in that case, so for_each does nothing. –  Useless Jul 4 at 22:39
1  
it2 should use upper_bound as OP want inclusive for upper bound. –  Jarod42 Jul 4 at 22:44

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