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I am trying to learn Python and I am stuck. Everything went fine until the last function which is the:

def get_class_average(students): 

up to that point it all works fine, but there, at the last function, I can't figure out how to make it work. I am trying to get the averages for each student, then calculate the averages of those averages, in other words the "class average" So, I only would like to know the answer for the last function without changing any of the functions before the last one:

lloyd = {
    "name": "Lloyd",
    "homework": [90.0, 97.0, 75.0, 92.0],
    "quizzes": [88.0, 40.0, 94.0],
    "tests": [75.0, 90.0]
}
alice = {
    "name": "Alice",
    "homework": [100.0, 92.0, 98.0, 100.0],
    "quizzes": [82.0, 83.0, 91.0],
    "tests": [89.0, 97.0]
}
tyler = {
    "name": "Tyler",
    "homework": [0.0, 87.0, 75.0, 22.0],
    "quizzes": [0.0, 75.0, 78.0],
    "tests": [100.0, 100.0]
}



def average(numbers):
       total = sum(numbers)
       return float(total) / len(numbers)


def get_average(student):
       homework = average(student["homework"]) 
       quizzes = average(student["quizzes"]) 
       tests = average(student["tests"]) 
       return 0.1 * average(student["homework"]) + 0.3 * average(student["quizzes"])    +     0.6 * average(student["tests"])

def get_letter_grade(score):
       if score >= 90:
              return "A"
       elif score >= 80:
              return "B"         
       elif score >= 70:
              return "C"
       elif score >= 60:
              return "D"
       else:
              return "F"

def get_class_average(students):
       results = []
       for student in results:
              get_average(student)
              results.append(student)
              average(student)
              return results

students = [lloyd,alice,tyler]

print get_class_average(students)

I finally figured out the solution for this one. So, I just want to post the corrected code here below for the last function, get_class_average(students). Now it works:

def get_class_average(students):
       results = []
       for each in students:
              studentavg = float(get_average(each))
              results.append(studentavg)
       return average(results)

students = [lloyd,alice,tyler]

print get_class_average(students)
share|improve this question
    
You should go through the previous functions and attempt to understand how they work first. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 5 '14 at 3:33
    
in get_class_average you're iterating over results (empty list) when you should be iterating over students. for student in students: Also put the return outside of the for loop - or else it will only return the first student. This should fix it for you. –  Jordan Jul 5 '14 at 3:33
    
Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams I understand how they work, I wrote the previous functions one by one and step by step. In the last function, I am obviously missing something –  Joe R Jul 5 '14 at 3:35
    
@Jordan I tried that, you are probably right that it should be fixed but even if I change that, it doesn't work –  Joe R Jul 5 '14 at 3:38
1  
Okay, instead of appending student to the results, append the get_average(student). This might be what you're looking for. results.append(get_average(student)) and then return the average of that set. return average(results) –  Jordan Jul 5 '14 at 4:13

1 Answer 1

You're not really supposed to take an average of an average, just so you know. I've corrected your code to get it to work correctly. Here it is:

lloyd = {
    "name": "Lloyd",
    "homework": [90.0, 97.0, 75.0, 92.0],
    "quizzes": [88.0, 40.0, 94.0],
    "tests": [75.0, 90.0]
}
alice = {
    "name": "Alice",
    "homework": [100.0, 92.0, 98.0, 100.0],
    "quizzes": [82.0, 83.0, 91.0],
    "tests": [89.0, 97.0]
}
tyler = {
    "name": "Tyler",
    "homework": [0.0, 87.0, 75.0, 22.0],
    "quizzes": [0.0, 75.0, 78.0],
    "tests": [100.0, 100.0]
}



def average(numbers):
    total = sum(numbers)
    return float(total) / len(numbers)


def get_average(student):
       homework = average(student["homework"]) 
       quizzes = average(student["quizzes"]) 
       tests = average(student["tests"]) 
       return 0.1 * average(student["homework"]) \
            + 0.3 * average(student["quizzes"]) \
        + 0.6 * average(student["tests"])

def get_letter_grade(score):
       if score >= 90:
              return "A"
       elif score >= 80:
              return "B"         
       elif score >= 70:
              return "C"
       elif score >= 60:
              return "D"
       else:
              return "F"

def get_class_average(students):
    results = []
    for student in students:
        a = get_average(student)
        results.append(a)
    return average(results)

students = [lloyd,alice,tyler]

print get_class_average(students)    

Since you're new to python, I've taken the better part of an hour or two and rewritten your code to use various features of python, including docstrings, generators, list comprehensions, classes, as well as a map-reduce pattern, and also some new imports as well as how to unit-test a module. I know you said to make minimal changes to your code, but I felt like it would be a discourtesy to you to simply solve your problem and move on. I wanted to give you some snippets, using your example, that I built up and learned while learning python myself.

My example is MUCH longer and larger than yours, and in NO way am I suggesting you take any path beyond the shortest and simplest route, I am merely providing an example. Don't be alarmed when you read this, just go through it and play with it and exploit it to the best of your ability. You may have to keep it ruminating around in your head & filesystem for awhile before it begins to make sense.

If you want to know what all that if __name__ == "__main__": garbage is about, I suggest you save my code in a file called Student.py and call import Student from a python interpreter session. Notice what happens differently :). Also, in the same session, after calling import Student (from the same directory Student.py is saved in, of course) type help(Student) -- I guarantee it will be worth your time.

from __future__ import division # to get rid of having to use float()
from math       import floor, log10 # for a helper function

class Student:
    """
    A class encapsulating elements of a student object. 
    Notable properties:
    homework_weight(0.1) --> a float multiplying student's homework average
    quiz_weight(0.3)     --> a float multiplying the student's quiz average
    test_weight(0.6)     --> a float multiplying the student's test average
    delimiter            --> a character used to separate fields in __str__
    """
    sig_figs        = 2
    homework_weight = 0.1
    quiz_weight     = 0.3
    test_weight     = 0.6
    delimiter       = '|'

    def __init__(self, name, homework, quizzes, tests):
        """
        Constructor for the Student object. Parameters are as follows:
        name      --> a string containing the student's name
        homework  --> a list of floats containing homework grades
        quizzes   --> a list of floats containing quiz grades
        tests     --> a list of floats containing test grades
        """
        self.__name     = name
        self.__homework = homework
        self.__quizzes  = quizzes
        self.__tests    = tests

    def get_name(self):
        """ Returns the current object's name """
        return self.__name

    def get_homeworks(self):
        """ yields a generator object for student's homework grades"""
        for i in self.__homework: yield i

    def get_quizzes(self):
        """ yields a generator object for student's quiz grades"""
        for i in self.__quizzes:  yield i

    def get_tests(self):
        """ yields a generator object for student's test grades"""
        for i in self.__tests:    yield i


    @classmethod
    def from_dict(cls, student_dict):
        """
        Creates a Student object from a dictionary. The dictionary must
        contain the following key-value pairs:
        'name'     : student_name
        'homework' : list of floats for homework grades
        'quizzes'  : list of floats for quiz grades
        'tests'    : list of floats for test grades
        """
        d = student_dict
        return cls(d['name'], d['homework'], d['quizzes'], d['tests'])

    def __str__(self):
        """
        Returns a string representation of the current
        object. The representation will be in the form
        of the fields separated by the default separator
        character (currently '|').
        """
        conv = lambda x, d: d.join(map(str, x))
        sep  = self.delimiter

        buff = ''
        buff +=      self.__name           + sep
        buff += conv(self.__homework, sep) + sep
        buff += conv(self.__quizzes,  sep) + sep
        buff += conv(self.__tests,    sep) 

        return buff

    def __repr__(self):
        """
        Returns a representation of the current object. In this
        case, we will return the same thing as __str__
        """
        return str(self)


    def to_dict(self):
        """
        Returns a dict representation of this object containing
        the keys ['name', 'homework', 'quizzes', 'tests'] where
        homework, quizzes, and tests are lists of floats.
        """
        obj = {}
        obj['name']     = self.__name
        obj['homework'] = self.__homework
        obj['quizzes']  = self.__quizzes
        obj['tests']    = self.__tests
        return obj



    def get_student_average(self, tuplify=False):
        """
        This method retrieves the student's class average according
        to predefined weighting rules. In this method, we average the
        list of scores together for the student's homework, quizzes,
        and tests, multiply them by their respective weights, and
        sum them together to obtain the final score. See implementation
        for more details.
        """
        hw = self.__homework
        qu = self.__quizzes
        ts = self.__tests

        if(0 not in map(len, [hw, qu, ts])): #division by zero, bla bla
            avg  = lambda l: sum(l)/len(l)
            avgs = map(avg,  [hw, qu, ts])
            hwa  = avgs[0] * Student.homework_weight
            qua  = avgs[1] * Student.quiz_weight
            tsa  = avgs[2] * Student.test_weight
            if tuplify is False:
                return sum([hwa, qua, tsa])
            else: 
                return (hwa, qua, tsa)

    def get_student_averages(self):
        """
        This method retrieves the student's class averages according
        to predefined weighting rules. In this method, we average the
        list of scores together for the student's homework, quizzes,
        and tests, multiply them by their respective weights, and return
        a set of them as a tuple where (homeworka, quiza, testa)
        See implementation for more details. 
        """
        return self.get_student_averages(tuplify=True)

    def get_student_letter_grade(self):
        """
        This method takes a student's letter score according to their
        average (computed by self.get_student_average()) and fetches
        the appropriate letter grade (A through F)
        """
        score = self.get_student_average()
        if   score >= 90:   return 'A'
        elif score >= 80:   return 'B'
        elif score >= 70:   return 'C'
        elif score >= 60:   return 'D'
        else:           return 'F'

    @staticmethod
    def __get_significant_average(grade_list):
        """ 
        Takes a list of grades and returns an average, does the average
        using proper significant figures according to a global variable
        grade_list -- a list of floats to average
        """
        sigfig = lambda x, n: round(x, -int(floor(log10(x))) + (n - 1))
        avg    = sigfig(sum(grade_list)/len(grade_list), num_figs)
        print '\t\t' + str(avg)
        return avg

    @staticmethod
    def get_class_set(student_list):
        """
        Generates a student object from a list of students
        and by assembling all the student's grades for each
        assignment and then using methods in the Student class
        to compute what we need to compute. 
        """
        # this is REALLY slick. What we're going to do is create a 
        # generator  generators of the student's homework and test
        # grades, but for the quizzes we will make regular list of
        # lists. 
        hwg = (x.get_homeworks()            for x in student_list)
        qwg = [[q for q in y.get_quizzes()] for y in student_list]
        twg = (z.get_tests()                for z in student_list)

        tl = lambda l: [x for x in l]
        # ^This is a lambda expression that converts a generator l
        # to a list (hence tl)



        # since each get_blabla() function returns a generator
        # and since each *wg variable is a generator of a generator
        # we will eventually get sublists of sublists of sublists
        # on and on and on and need to flatten them. Here are three
        # ways to do that. 
    # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/952914/making-a-flat-list-out-of-list-of-lists-in-python 
        hwl = [item for sublist in hwg for item in sublist]
        qwl = sum(qwg, []) 
        twl = reduce(lambda x,y: tl(x)+tl(y), twg)

        class_set = Student('class_whole_set', hwl, qwl, twl)
        return class_set




if __name__ == "__main__":

    lloyd = {
        "name": "Lloyd",
        "homework": [90.0, 97.0, 75.0, 92.0],
        "quizzes": [88.0, 40.0, 94.0],
        "tests": [75.0, 90.0]
    }

    alice = {
        "name": "Alice",
        "homework": [100.0, 92.0, 98.0, 100.0],
        "quizzes": [82.0, 83.0, 91.0],
        "tests": [89.0, 97.0]
    }

    tyler = {
        "name": "Tyler",
        "homework": [0.0, 87.0, 75.0, 22.0],
        "quizzes": [0.0, 75.0, 78.0],
        "tests": [100.0, 100.0]
    }

    slloyd  = Student.from_dict(lloyd)
    salice  = Student(alice['name'], alice['homework'], alice['quizzes'], alice['tests'])
    styler  = Student.from_dict(tyler)

#  YOU COULD DO THIS!
#   print 'lloyd dict'
#   print '\t' + str(sdlloyd)
#
#   print 'alice ctor'
#   print '\t' + str(slloyd)
#
#   print 'slloyd name: ' + slloyd.to_dict()['name']
#   print 'slloyd home: ' + str(map(str, slloyd.to_dict()['homework']))
#   print 'slloyd quiz: ' + str(map(str, slloyd.to_dict()['quizzes']))
#   print 'slloyd test: ' + str(map(str, slloyd.to_dict()['tests']))
#   print 'slloyd avg:  ' + str(slloyd.get_student_average())
#
#   conv = lambda x: str(map(str, x))
#   print 'salice name: ' + salice.get_name()
#   print 'salice home: ' + conv(salice.get_homeworks())
#   print 'salice quiz: ' + conv(salice.get_quizzes())
#   print 'salice test: ' + conv(salice.get_tests())
#   print 'salice avg:  ' + str(salice.get_student_average())
#


    """Unit test some object obj"""
    def unit_test(objname, obj):
        conv = lambda x: str(map(str, x))
        print str(objname) + ' name: ' + obj.get_name()
        print str(objname) + ' home: ' + conv(obj.get_homeworks())
        print str(objname) + ' quiz: ' + conv(obj.get_quizzes())
        print str(objname) + ' test: ' + conv(obj.get_tests())
        print str(objname) + ' avg : ' + str(obj.get_student_average())
        print str(objname) + ' let : ' + obj.get_student_letter_grade()

    sclss  = Student.get_class_set( [slloyd, salice, styler] )
    unit_test('sclss', sclss)
    unit_test('slloyd', slloyd)
    unit_test('salice', salice)
    unit_test('styler', styler)

Please let me know if this helps you and if you are confused by any aspect of this code. Welcome to stack overflow :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much for your answer. I am still studying your longer example code of your second answer which is indeed very complex. I appreciate it very much.However, the first, simple version still not returning what I am looking for. What I am trying to get with the last function, get_class_average, is to first get the average for each student using the function get_average(), somehow append that to the results and finally return the class average, which is the average of each student’s average, by using the function average(). Please kindly let me know your thoughts. –  Joe R Jul 6 '14 at 23:09
    
You're so welcome. If my answer helped you in a significant way, do not forget to mark it as the answer. My second piece of code isn't all that complex once you trace it all out -- my recommendation is to print it out and hand-trace with a pen and paper. Also, the simple version of get_class_average does exactly what you said; even though it is technically an incorrect practice to average an average. What results were you getting that you did not like? –  alvonellos Jul 8 '14 at 1:43
    
@ alvonellos I edited my original question and posted the solution to the problem. Please see my edit above. –  Joe R Jul 8 '14 at 4:13
    
I'm glad my answer helped. –  alvonellos Jul 9 '14 at 15:34

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