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/The first part of this message is solved, I added an edit below/

I need to malloc an array of strings, and its relative strings. I searched around a bit, but the problem was a little different. What I need to do is ask the user for a value, then check if the value is present in the previous positions of the array. To do this I was using binary search in this way:

BinarySearch(stringa** array, char* value, 0, i)

Where i is the iteration index.

I was getting a segfault in the strcmp() inside of the binary search. With a bit of debug, I understood that the problem isn't in the binary search but in the way I malloc the array of strings. This is a simple code I am using for debug reasons.

Definition of struct:

typedef struct _stringa {
char* string;
int freq;
} stringa;

Then inside the main:

scanf("%d", &n); // Number of strings

stringa** array;
array = (stringa**)malloc(n*sizeof(char*));

for (i=0; i<n; i++) {
    char* value = (char*) malloc(101* sizeof(char));
    scanf("%s", value);

    array[i]->string = (char*)malloc(101 * sizeof(char) );
    array[i]->string = value;
    array[i]->freq = 1;
}

I get my segfault:

array[i]->string = (char*)malloc(101 * sizeof(char) );

So my guess is that it doesn't think that in array[i]->string there should be a string. How can I fix this? Sorry, I am at the start yet of my programming

Thank you in advance!

EDIT: I now fixed the array of strings as suggested in the comments, but I get a similar segfault in my binary search: int BinarySearch(stringa* array, char* string, int left, int right) {

int middle;

if (left==right) {
    if (strcmp(string,array[left].string)==0) {
        return left;
    } else {
        return -1;
    }
}

middle = (left+right)/2;
if ((strcmp(string,array[middle].string)<0) || (strcmp(string,array[middle].string)==0) ) {
    return BinarySearch(array, string, left, middle);
} else {
    return BinarySearch(array, string, middle+1, right);
}

}

The problem is at the line:

if ((strcmp(string,array[middle].string)<0) || (strcmp(string,array[middle].string)==0) ) {

or here:

 if (left==right) {
        if (strcmp(string,array[left].string)==0) {

Why in your opinion?

share|improve this question
    
Don't cast malloc in C: stackoverflow.com/questions/605845/… –  Barmar Jul 5 '14 at 8:05
    
I would also suggest using calloc instead of malloc; similar cost, and protects against certain null-termination problems –  tucuxi Jul 5 '14 at 8:14
    
@Barmar and tucuxi, thank you for the useful advices. I still need to learn how to properly use malloc and pointers. By the way, I added an extra problem in the edit –  Roberto Jul 5 '14 at 8:20
    
Can left, right, middle ever exceed n - 1 (the number of structs (-1 for 0 index))? –  David C. Rankin Jul 5 '14 at 9:16
    
Hey @DavidC.Rankin I don't think they can - but I actually need the right side to be i, which is the index of the for loop. Because if I set the right side to n, I would have a segmentation fault, as I haven't stored yet any value in the remaining n-i elements. –  Roberto Jul 5 '14 at 9:36

3 Answers 3

array should just be an array of stringa, not an array of pointers.

scanf("%d", &n); // Number of strings

stringa* array;
array = malloc(n*sizeof(stringa));

for (i=0; i<n; i++) {
    char* value = malloc(101* sizeof(char));
    scanf("%s", value);

    array[i].string = value;
    array[i].freq = 1;
}

But if you really want an array of pointers to stringa, the code would be:

stringa** array;
array = malloc(n * sizeof(stringa*)); // Allocate array of pointers

for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    stringa[i] = malloc(sizeof(stringa)); // Allocate this struct
    char* value = malloc(101* sizeof(char)); // Allocate the string
    scanf("%s", value);

    array[i]->string = value;
    array[i]->freq = 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I indeed needed to use just a * in my stringa* array! –  Roberto Jul 5 '14 at 8:16

You didn't deal with stringa correctly. As long as you've enclosed a char* inside stringa, you only need stringa * to represent an array of string.

stringa* array = malloc(n*sizeof(stringa));

for (i=0; i<n; i++) {
    char value[101];
    scanf("%s", value);

    array[i].string = malloc(101 * sizeof(char));
    strcpy(array[i].string, value);
    array[i].freq = 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you timrau! This now works! –  Roberto Jul 5 '14 at 8:16
    
It works while I get the strings, but when I try to BinarySearch them I still get another segmentation fault, I added the code in the original post –  Roberto Jul 5 '14 at 8:30

Well there are a couple of errors in your code. Here is an example with comments:

int main (void)
{
    char value[101];
    int n = 0;
    char strip;

    printf ("Enter the number of structures to create: ");
    scanf("%d", &n); // Number of strings
    strip = getchar(); while (strip != '\n') strip = getchar(); // flush stdin

    stringa **array = NULL;
    array = malloc ( n * sizeof (struct _stringa *) );

    int i = 0;

    for (i=0; i<n; i++) {

        array[i] = malloc (sizeof (struct _stringa));
        array[i]->string = malloc (sizeof (value));   // example only (strdup allocates)

        printf ("Enter the text of array[%d]->string : ", i);
        scanf("%s", value);
        strip = getchar(); while (strip != '\n') strip = getchar(); // flush stdin

        array[i]->string = strdup(value);   // dup content of value
        array[i]->freq = 501;               // dummy value

        printf ("  array[%d]->string: %s  array[%d]->freq: %d\n",
                i, array[i]->string, i, array[i]->freq);
    }

    while (--n >= 0) {
        if (array[n]->string) free (array[n]->string);
        if (array[n]) free (array[n]);
    }

    if (array) free (array);

    return 0;
}

output:

Enter the number of structures to create: 4
Enter the text of array[0]->string : my
    array[0]->string: my  array[0]->freq: 501
Enter the text of array[1]->string : dog
    array[1]->string: dog  array[1]->freq: 501
Enter the text of array[2]->string : has
    array[2]->string: has  array[2]->freq: 501
Enter the text of array[3]->string : fleas
    array[3]->string: fleas  array[3]->freq: 501
share|improve this answer
    
Hello, to be honest I never used the get char and strdup functions, as I am still at the beginning. May I ask you where is the mistake in calling the binary search in my previous function? –  Roberto Jul 5 '14 at 9:37
    
I've been looking at it and I left a comment. The only thing I can see from the code posted would be if left middle or right ever exceeded the number of structures allocated. As for the strdup and getchar, getchar is just there to strip any remaining chars from the input buffer after you read n and each string. Your choice of scanf is a little dubious. Especially if you ever need a string with spaces. getline() is much better. The point with strdup is there is no need to allocate array[i]->string when using strdup it does it for you. –  David C. Rankin Jul 5 '14 at 9:45
    
I know scanf isn't really the best in these cases, but in my class, they told us to use that at the moment, because at the exam, the computer will check our program with an input txt file, and other functions might cause problems. As I replied in the other comment above, it shouldn't exceed the number of structs, and it stops to the i iteration. and i can be at maximum n, which is the total amount of structures –  Roberto Jul 5 '14 at 9:49
    
That is what I think the problem is. If it stops as n and attempts to read array[n]->string or array[n]->freq you will segfault because you have only defined array[0] -to- array[n-1] –  David C. Rankin Jul 5 '14 at 9:55
    
yes but it will never attempt to read array[n]->string, because it reads each time array[i]->string, and i is an integer that goes from [0..n-1]. But it stops at i=0, so the problem maybe is in that left==right condition –  Roberto Jul 5 '14 at 13:14

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