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When you are going to print an object, a friend operator<< is used. Can we use member function for operator<< ?

class A {

public:
void operator<<(ostream& i) { i<<"Member function";}
friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& i, A& a) { i<<"operator<<"; return i;}
};


int main () {

   A a;
   A b;
   A c;
   cout<<a<<b<<c<<endl;
   a<<cout;
  return 0;
}

One point is that friend function enable us to use it like this

cout<<a<<b<<c

What other reasons?

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3  
Do you really need any other reasons? –  Michael Myers Mar 16 '10 at 21:59
    
@mmyers: I just try to understand it as clear as I can.... –  skydoor Mar 16 '10 at 22:01
1  
It obviously can't be a member function (see Charles Bailey's answer), but it doesn't have to be a friend - if you can implement it in terms of the public interface of the class, that would be super. –  UncleBens Mar 16 '10 at 22:04
1  
Dupe stackoverflow.com/questions/236801/… –  anon Mar 16 '10 at 22:08
    
You answered it in your question. It can't be a member function because if it were you'd have to write a << cout instead of cout << a which reverses the meaning of the operator and prevents it from being chained together. That's plenty of reason to avoid making it a member function. –  Joe Gauterin Mar 16 '10 at 22:14
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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You have to use a free function and not a member function as for binary operators the left hand side is always *this for member functions with the right hand side being passed as the other parameter.

For output stream operators the left hand side is always the stream object so if you are streaming to a standard class and not writing the stream yourself you have to provide a free function and not a member of your class.

Although it would be possible to provide a backwards stream operator as a member function and stream out like this:

myObject >> std::cout;

not only would you violate a very strong library convention, as you point out, chaining output operations would not work due to the left-to-right grouping of >>.

Edit: As others have noted, while you have to make it a free function it only needs to be a friend if the streaming function cannot be implemented in terms of the class' public interface.

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You have no choice -- it has to be a free function.

Note, however, that it need not necessarily be a friend function. It only needs to be a friend if you actually need to grant it private access. For example, I use the following in programming competitions:

template <class A, class B>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::pair<A, B>& p)
{
  return os << '(' << p.first << ", " << p.second << ')';
}

No need for it to be friend, as first and second are accessible publicly.

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A further reason in your example - it has to be a friend because that's the only way to define a free function inside the class definition. If you wanted a non-friend free function, it would have to be defined outside the class.

Why would you prefer to define it in the class? Sometimes it's nice to define all the operators together:

struct SomeClass {
    // blah blah blah
    SomeClass &operator+=(const SomeClass &rhs) {
        // do something
    }
    friend SomeClass operator+(SomeClass lhs, const SomeClass &rhs) {
        lhs += rhs;
        return lhs;
    }
    // blah blah blah
    // several pages later
};

might be a bit more user-friendly than:

struct SomeClass {
    // blah blah blah
    SomeClass &operator+=(const SomeClass &rhs) {
        // do something
    }
    // blah blah blah
    // several pages later
};

SomeClass operator+(SomeClass lhs, const SomeClass &rhs) {
    lhs += rhs;
    return lhs;
}

This assumes of course that you are defining the related member functions in the class definition, rather that declaring them there and defining them in a .cpp file.

Edit: I've used += and + as an example without really thinking about it, but your question is about operator<<, which doesn't have any closely related operators like operator+ does. But if operator<< calls one or more member functions related to printing, you might want to define it near where they're defined.

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You can't. But If you don't want it to be a friend function, make it a free function and implement it in terms of the class' public interface. For eg.

 ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, Myclass& obj)
{
   return obj.print(os);
}

ostream& MyClass::print(ostream& os)
{
   os << val; // for example.
   return os;
}
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