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I have an structure similar to:

typedef struct FOO {

  int m,n;
  int * am;
  gsl_vector * bn;

} foo;

To allocate this structures I do:

foo * bar; 
bar=foo_alloc ( 10, 10 ); 

Where

foo * foo_alloc ( int m, int n ) {
  foo * f = (foo*)malloc(sizeof(foo));

  f->m=m;
  f->n=n;
  f->am=(int*)calloc(m,sizeof(int));
  f->bn=gsl_vector_calloc(n);
  return f;
}

I wish to write bar in a binary file and then read it again... How can I do this?

Thanks!

EDIT:

To be more specific, I tried with

fwrite(&bar,sizeof(*bar),1,file)

but sizeof(*bar) didn't work and by Google search I found that sizeof don't work with this kind of structures with dynamic arrays inside.

Is there a way to obtain the size of bar?

If not, I supouse I have to place an fwrite for each element, but in this case I don't know how to obtain the size of gsl_vector since this is also another structure with a dynamic array inside.

share|improve this question
    
Er… write it into a (binary) file and read it again?… And don't tell me your Google didn't tell you that… –  mafso Jul 5 at 23:47
    
Oh, and a serious comment: Do a search for endianness. –  mafso Jul 5 at 23:49
    
I tryed googling, but I found the things confusing. Since I am not a C programer, I wish to double check before trust in my self understanding of the google results. –  alexis Jul 5 at 23:52
    
And now? The code you've posted seems to be correct; the only question you've asked is answered with “look at write and read”. If something of the solutions you've found in the web is confusing, then tell us what's confusing. Sorry, but I can't figure out what you're asking. –  mafso Jul 5 at 23:58
    
“but sizeof(*bar) didn't work”—what does that mean? In which way it didn't work? –  mafso Jul 6 at 0:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

sizeof(*bar) is correct. It's &bar that's wrong. Since bar is a pointer, you shouldn't use the address-of operator.

Also, you've only attempted to write the struct and haven't written the dynamically-allocated array data. Actually, writing the struct is pointless since the addresses will not be valid when the data is read back. You should just write the sizes (m and n) and the array data. When you read it back you need to malloc/calloc the struct and array space again.

Here's a runnable example. I've replaced your gsl_vectors with double to make it easier for other people to run.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct {
    int m, n;
    int *am;
    double *bn;
} Foo;

void foo_write(Foo *f, FILE *file) {
    fwrite(&(f->m), sizeof(f->m), 1, file);
    fwrite(&(f->n), sizeof(f->n), 1, file);
    fwrite(f->am, sizeof(*(f->am)), f->m, file);
    fwrite(f->bn, sizeof(*(f->bn)), f->n, file);
}

Foo *foo_read(FILE *file) {
    Foo *f = malloc(sizeof(*f));
    fread(&(f->m), sizeof(f->m), 1, file);
    fread(&(f->n), sizeof(f->n), 1, file);
    f->am = malloc(f->m * sizeof(*(f->am)));
    f->bn = malloc(f->n * sizeof(*(f->bn)));
    fread(f->am, sizeof(*(f->am)), f->m, file);
    fread(f->bn, sizeof(*(f->bn)), f->n, file);
    return f;
}

Foo *foo_alloc(int m, int n) {
    Foo *f = malloc(sizeof(*f));
    f->m = m;
    f->n = n;
    f->am = calloc(f->m, sizeof(*(f->am)));
    f->bn = calloc(f->n, sizeof(*(f->bn)));
    return f;
}

void foo_print(Foo *f) {
    int i;
    printf("%d, %d\n", f->m, f->n);
    for (i = 0; i < f->m; ++i)
        printf("%d ", f->am[i]);
    putchar('\n');
    for (i = 0; i < f->n; ++i)
        printf("%.1f ", f->bn[i]);
}

void foo_free(Foo *f) {
    free(f->am);
    free(f->bn);
    free(f);
}

int main() {
    FILE *file; 
    Foo *bar;
    int i;

    bar = foo_alloc(5, 10);
    for (i = 0; i < bar->m; ++i)
        bar->am[i] = i;
    for (i = 0; i < bar->n; ++i)
        bar->bn[i] = i;


    file = fopen("foo.bin", "wb");
    foo_write(bar, file);
    fclose(file);

    foo_free(bar);

    file = fopen("foo.bin", "rb");
    bar = foo_read(file);
    fclose(file);

    foo_print(bar);

    return 0;
}

You may be able to write and read the gsl_vectors like this (assuming the vectors are independent, i.e., that they don't share data blocks):

void foo_write(Foo *f, FILE *file) {
    size_t i;
    fwrite(&(f->m), sizeof(f->m), 1, file);
    fwrite(&(f->n), sizeof(f->n), 1, file);
    fwrite(f->am, sizeof(*(f->am)), f->m, file);
    for (i = 0; i < f->n; ++i)
        gsl_vector_fwrite(file, &(f->bn[i]));
}

Foo *foo_read(FILE *file) {
    size_t i;
    Foo *f = malloc(sizeof(*f));
    fread(&(f->m), sizeof(f->m), 1, file);
    fread(&(f->n), sizeof(f->n), 1, file);
    f->am = malloc(f->m * sizeof(*(f->am)));
    f->bn = malloc(f->n * sizeof(*(f->bn)));
    fread(f->am, sizeof(*(f->am)), f->m, file);
    for (i = 0; i < f->n; ++i)
        gsl_vector_fread(file, &(f->bn[i]));
    return f;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! Nice answer, the example also answer other questions that I even do. I tried your example with the gsl_vector and work well. However gsl_vector have other dynamic structures inside. Should I read gsl_vector bn as you do in foo_read? Why my success with fread(f->bn, sizeof(*(f->bn)), f->n, file);? –  alexis Jul 6 at 1:14
1  
@alexis Looking at gsl_vectors, things are definitely more complicated. If all of the vectors are independent (each owns its own data block), then you could probably use gsl_vector_fwrite and gsl_vector_fread (see edit above). The simple fwrite may have worked because the memory with the data still existed, which will not generally be the case! If you wrote one program to save the data and a different program to read it, it definitely wouldn't work. –  ooga Jul 6 at 1:58
    
Thanks ooga !! And thanks in particular for that last edit and comment, that really help me a lot. –  alexis Jul 6 at 2:46

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