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I'm having a trouble when I'm trying to user params.require(...).permit(...)

In my application I received the follow param dic:

{"utf8"=>"✓",
 "authenticity_token"=>"Vatzcb5tgTu2+wL1t6Of+FbIK8Ibp+tM03Naai4b2OU=",
 "/login"=>{"username_or_email"=>"jonatasteixeira",
 "password"=>"[FILTERED]"},
 "commit"=>"Save /login" }

I would like to know why the my key received the "/login" name.

My view:

<h1>Login</h1>

<%= form_for(login_path) do |f| %>
  <div class="field">
    <%= f.label :username_or_email %><br>
    <%= f.text_field :username_or_email %>
  </div>
  <div class="field">
    <%= f.label :password %><br>
    <%= f.password_field :password %>
  </div>
  <div class="actions">
    <%= f.submit %>
  </div>
<% end %>

<%= link_to 'Back', root_path %>

In my controller

class SessionsController < ApplicationController

  # GET /login
  def new
    @user = User.new
  end

  # POST /login
  def create
    @user = User.find_by_emai(session_params[:username_or_email]) || User.find_by_username(session_params[:username_or_email]) 
      if @user && @user.authenticate(session_params[:password])
        session[:current_user_id] = @user.id
        flash[:notice] = 'You are logged in'
      else
        flash[:notice] = 'Invalid password, username or email'
      end
  end

  private
  # Never trust parameters from the scary internet, only allow the white list through.
  def session_params
      logger.info :login
      params.require("/login").permit(:username_or_email, :password)
  end
end

I dont want to use "/login" as key, I would like to use :login. Some one knows how could I adjust it?

Thanks!!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As @Rafal pointed out, you could code your call to form_for like this to get rid of the awkward /login key in your params:

<%= form_for(:login) do |f| %>

Strong parameters are really only for scenarios where you are doing mass assignment on an object. If you were creating the user, for example, then you would probably want to pass the attributes into the new initializer method using strong parameters.

@user = User.new(session_params)

But because you're not doing mass assignment in this case, you can just pass in the values directly without a session_params method:

# POST /login
def create
  @user = User.find_by(email: params[:login][:username_or_email]) || User.find_by(username: params[:login][:username_or_email]) 
  if @user && @user.authenticate(params[:login][:password])
    session[:current_user_id] = @user.id
    flash[:notice] = 'You are logged in'
  else
    flash[:notice] = 'Invalid password, username or email'
  end
end

The whole point of strong parameters is so no one can pass in extra attributes. In your /login scenario, your code is completely in control of the values being handled, so you don't need to worry about it.

share|improve this answer
    
OK.. I did this adjusts but. I'm getting this error: "param is missing or the value is empty: login" –  JonatasTeixeira Jul 6 '14 at 1:34
    
If you reload the form and inspect one of the fields, does it look something like this? <input type="text" name="login[username_or_password]" value="" /> –  Chris Peters Jul 6 '14 at 1:37
    
P.S. You should be using find_by(email: ...) and find_by(username: ...) in Rails 4. I think the dynamic finders like find_by_email and find_by_username are deprecated in version 4. –  Chris Peters Jul 6 '14 at 1:39
    
Fixed.. Thanks!!! –  JonatasTeixeira Jul 6 '14 at 1:51

Form_For

When you use form_for, Rails expects an object to be passed so it can build a variety of different elements from it:

[The form_for] helper is designed to make working with resources much easier compared to using vanilla HTML.

The problem is you're passing a route to this method, which I'm surprised actually works.

--

form_tag

You'll be better using a symbol, as recommended by the accepted answer, or by using form_tag, which doesn't require an object:

<%= form_tag login_path do %>
    <%= text_field_tag :username_or_email %>
    <%= password_field_tag :password %>
    <%= submit_button_tag "Go" %>
<% end %>

This will remove the references to the "login" key of your params, and will give you the ability to do this (no need for require):

params.permit(:username_or_email, :password)
share|improve this answer

Instead of

<%= form_for(login_path) do |f| %>

use

<%= form_for(:login) do |f| %>

share|improve this answer
    
I did it, but its not fix my trouble, the params remains iqual! –  JonatasTeixeira Jul 6 '14 at 1:29

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