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Is there any general-purpose form of short-time Fourier transform with corresponding inverse transform built into SciPy or NumPy or whatever?

There's the pyplot specgram function in matplotlib, which calls ax.specgram(), which calls mlab.specgram(), which calls _spectral_helper():

#The checks for if y is x are so that we can use the same function to
#implement the core of psd(), csd(), and spectrogram() without doing
#extra calculations.  We return the unaveraged Pxy, freqs, and t.

but

This is a helper function that implements the commonality between the 204 #psd, csd, and spectrogram. It is NOT meant to be used outside of mlab

I'm not sure if this can be used to do an STFT and ISTFT, though. Is there anything else, or should I translate something like these MATLAB functions?

I know how to write my own ad-hoc implementation; I'm just looking for something full-featured, which can handle different windowing functions (but has a sane default), is fully invertible with COLA windows (istft(stft(x))==x), tested by multiple people, no off-by-one errors, handles the ends and zero padding well, fast RFFT implementation for real input, etc.

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I'm looking for exactly the same thing, similar to Matlab's "spectrogram" function. –  khpeek May 10 at 21:08
    
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6 Answers

Neither of the above answers worked well OOTB for me. So I modified Steve Tjoa's.

import scipy, pylab
import numpy as np

def stft(x, fs, framesz, hop):
    """
     x - signal
     fs - sample rate
     framesz - frame size
     hop - hop size (frame size = overlap + hop size)
    """
    framesamp = int(framesz*fs)
    hopsamp = int(hop*fs)
    w = scipy.hamming(framesamp)
    X = scipy.array([scipy.fft(w*x[i:i+framesamp]) 
                     for i in range(0, len(x)-framesamp, hopsamp)])
    return X

def istft(X, fs, T, hop):
    """ T - signal length """
    length = T*fs
    x = scipy.zeros(T*fs)
    framesamp = X.shape[1]
    hopsamp = int(hop*fs)
    for n,i in enumerate(range(0, len(x)-framesamp, hopsamp)):
        x[i:i+framesamp] += scipy.real(scipy.ifft(X[n]))
    # calculate the inverse envelope to scale results at the ends.
    env = scipy.zeros(T*fs)
    w = scipy.hamming(framesamp)
    for i in range(0, len(x)-framesamp, hopsamp):
        env[i:i+framesamp] += w
    env[-(length%hopsamp):] += w[-(length%hopsamp):]
    env = np.maximum(env, .01)
    return x/env # right side is still a little messed up...
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Here is the STFT code that I use. STFT + ISTFT here gives perfect reconstruction (even for the first frames). I slightly modified the code given here by Steve Tjoa : here the magnitude of the reconstructed signal is the same as that of the input signal.

import scipy, numpy as np

def stft(x, fftsize=1024, overlap=4):   
    hop = fftsize / overlap
    w = scipy.hanning(fftsize+1)[:-1]      # better reconstruction with this trick +1)[:-1]  
    return np.array([np.fft.rfft(w*x[i:i+fftsize]) for i in range(0, len(x)-fftsize, hop)])

def istft(X, overlap=4):   
    fftsize=(X.shape[1]-1)*2
    hop = fftsize / overlap
    w = scipy.hanning(fftsize+1)[:-1]
    x = scipy.zeros(X.shape[0]*hop)
    wsum = scipy.zeros(X.shape[0]*hop) 
    for n,i in enumerate(range(0, len(x)-fftsize, hop)): 
        x[i:i+fftsize] += scipy.real(np.fft.irfft(X[n])) * w   # overlap-add
        wsum[i:i+fftsize] += w ** 2.
    pos = wsum != 0
    x[pos] /= wsum[pos]
    return x
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Here is my Python code, simplified for this answer:

import scipy, pylab

def stft(x, fs, framesz, hop):
    framesamp = int(framesz*fs)
    hopsamp = int(hop*fs)
    w = scipy.hamming(framesamp)
    X = scipy.array([scipy.fft(w*x[i:i+framesamp]) 
                     for i in range(0, len(x)-framesamp, hopsamp)])
    return X

def istft(X, fs, T, hop):
    x = scipy.zeros(T*fs)
    framesamp = X.shape[1]
    hopsamp = int(hop*fs)
    for n,i in enumerate(range(0, len(x)-framesamp, hopsamp)):
        x[i:i+framesamp] += scipy.real(scipy.ifft(X[n]))
    return x

Notes:

  1. The list comprehension is a little trick I like to use to simulate block processing of signals in numpy/scipy. It's like blkproc in Matlab. Instead of a for loop, I apply a command (e.g., fft) to each frame of the signal inside a list comprehension, and then scipy.array casts it to a 2D-array. I use this to make spectrograms, chromagrams, MFCC-grams, and much more.
  2. For this example, I use a naive overlap-and-add method in istft. Due to windowing and frame overlap, the magnitude of the reconstructed signal is not the same as that of the input signal. You will need to adjust that yourself, somehow.
  3. There are probably more principled ways of computing the ISTFT. This example is mainly meant to be educational.

A test:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    f0 = 440         # Compute the STFT of a 440 Hz sinusoid
    fs = 8000        # sampled at 8 kHz
    T = 5            # lasting 5 seconds
    framesz = 0.050  # with a frame size of 50 milliseconds
    hop = 0.020      # and hop size of 20 milliseconds.

    # Create test signal and STFT.
    t = scipy.linspace(0, T, T*fs, endpoint=False)
    x = scipy.sin(2*scipy.pi*f0*t)
    X = stft(x, fs, framesz, hop)

    # Plot the magnitude spectrogram.
    pylab.figure()
    pylab.imshow(scipy.absolute(X.T), origin='lower', aspect='auto',
                 interpolation='nearest')
    pylab.xlabel('Time')
    pylab.ylabel('Frequency')
    pylab.show()

    # Compute the ISTFT.
    xhat = istft(X, fs, T, hop)

    # Plot the input and output signals over 0.1 seconds.
    T1 = int(0.1*fs)

    pylab.figure()
    pylab.plot(t[:T1], x[:T1], t[:T1], xhat[:T1])
    pylab.xlabel('Time (seconds)')

    pylab.figure()
    pylab.plot(t[-T1:], x[-T1:], t[-T1:], xhat[-T1:])
    pylab.xlabel('Time (seconds)')

STFT of 440 Hz sinusoid ISTFT of 440 Hz sinusoid ISTFT of 440 Hz sinusoid

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Is there an unsimplified version online you can link to? –  endolith Jul 31 '11 at 21:02
    
Not off the top of my head. But is there anything wrong with the above code? You can modify it, if necessary. –  Steve Tjoa Aug 2 '11 at 4:41
    
No, but you said "simplified for this answer", so I assumed this was an abridged version of something else you wrote –  endolith Aug 2 '11 at 4:44
1  
Sorry for the confusion. Yes, simplified from my application-specific needs. Example features: if the input is a stereo signal, make it mono first; plot the spectrogram over a given frequency and time range; plot the log-spectrogram; round framesamp up to the nearest power of two; embed stft inside a Spectrogram class; etc. Your needs may differ. But the core code above still gets the job done. –  Steve Tjoa Aug 2 '11 at 5:09
2  
Thanks for this code. Just a remark : what happens in stft if x is not a multiple of the hop length ? Shouldn't the last frame be zero-padded ? –  Basj Nov 19 '13 at 14:08
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If you have access to a C binary library that does what you want, then use http://code.google.com/p/ctypesgen/ to generate a Python interface to that library.

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I also found this on GitHub, but it seems to operate on pipelines instead of normal arrays:

http://github.com/ronw/frontend/blob/master/basic.py#LID281

def STFT(nfft, nwin=None, nhop=None, winfun=np.hanning):
    ...
    return dataprocessor.Pipeline(Framer(nwin, nhop), Window(winfun),
                                  RFFT(nfft))


def ISTFT(nfft, nwin=None, nhop=None, winfun=np.hanning):
    ...
    return dataprocessor.Pipeline(IRFFT(nfft), Window(winfun),
                                  OverlapAdd(nwin, nhop))
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Found another STFT, but no corresponding inverse function:

http://code.google.com/p/pytfd/source/browse/trunk/pytfd/stft.py

def stft(x, w, L=None):
    ...
    return X_stft
  • w is a window function as an array
  • L is the overlap, in samples
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