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Suppose I have four __m128i variables that contain data resulting from some computation. For example, let us say:

__m128i a = _mm_set_epi64x(1, 11);
__m128i b = _mm_set_epi64x(2, 22);
__m128i c = _mm_set_epi64x(3, 33);
__m128i d = _mm_set_epi64x(4, 44);

I want to initialize two __m256i variables, where the first one contains all the high 64-bits of four variables, and the second one contains the low 64-bits of each. So I want to have:

__m256i x = ...; // x = { 4, 3, 2, 1 };
__m256i y = ...; // y = { 44, 33, 22, 11 };

The obvious way of doing this is to use _mm256_set_epi64x and _mm_extract_epi64. However, it's probably not particularly fast. Is there a faster way of doing it? In particular, for accessing the 64 high bits, I see no suitable load (there is a load for the lower 64 bits in SSE2) or shuffle instruction (there seems to be no "64-bit shuffle").

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1  
What's the instruction you saw to load the lower 64 bits? – John Zwinck Jul 6 '14 at 11:24
1  
@JohnZwinck _mm_loadl_epi64, but it's for the 128-bit registers. – Gideon Jul 6 '14 at 11:25
1  
You mention there is no 64-bit shuffle, but who would need one? We have _mm256_shuffle_epi32 and if we want to shuffle 64-bit chunks we can just claim we're doing 32-bit chunks and do the shuffle such that adjacent 32-bit chunks move together. – John Zwinck Jul 6 '14 at 12:06
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If I understand you question correctly, this is a simple 4x2 transpose (or 2x4 tranpose?).

Here's a code that is working for me:

#include <iostream>
#include <immintrin.h>

using namespace std;
int main() {
    __m128i a = _mm_set_epi64x(1, 11);
    __m128i b = _mm_set_epi64x(2, 22);
    __m128i c = _mm_set_epi64x(3, 33);
    __m128i d = _mm_set_epi64x(4, 44);

    __m256i ac = _mm256_castsi128_si256(a);
    ac = _mm256_inserti128_si256(ac, c, 1); // {3, 33, 1, 11}

    __m256i bd = _mm256_castsi128_si256(b);
    bd = _mm256_inserti128_si256(bd, d, 1); // {4, 44, 2, 22}

    __m256i high = _mm256_unpackhi_epi64(ac, bd);
    __m256i low = _mm256_unpacklo_epi64(ac, bd);

    uint64_t t[4];

    _mm256_storeu_si256((__m256i*) t, high);

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i) {
        cout << t[i] << endl;
    }

    _mm256_storeu_si256((__m256i*) t, low);

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i) {
        cout << t[i] << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

This should compile into 4 instructions.

share|improve this answer
1  
Clever. My attempt was looking like six instructions. – John Zwinck Jul 6 '14 at 12:09

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