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Suppose I have two documents that are identical except the lines are shuffled. Is there a tool that can show me which lines in document A correspond to which lines on document B by drawing lines to connect them (kinda like Cairo does for machine translation word alignments)?

What if the files have some level of differing lines (I don't want to figure out which lines are similar to each other -- if there isn't an exact match for a line, then that line has no match.)

Note: I am not looking to sort the files and compare them, rather I am looking to get a visualization of how far out of order the files are relative to each other, and which particular regions tend to move together, and which tend to be shuffled.

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Windiff will show you the line in the left file it thinks the line in the right file came from, but it's often mistaken when lines are the same (e.g. a line with just a } in a cc file). –  i_am_jorf Mar 19 '10 at 21:57
    
jeffamaphone, I gave it a try under Wine, and it looks like it does the right thing. Can you submit your answer as an answer rather than as a comment, so that you'll be eligible for the bounty? Do you know of similar software for Linux? –  Ken Bloom Mar 21 '10 at 4:50
    
@jeffamaphone - see Ken's comment... @Ken - FYI if you prefix a user's name with an @ when you reply to a comment, they'll get notified by the system (see: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/43019/…) –  Alconja Mar 22 '10 at 2:48

2 Answers 2

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Windiff will show you the line in the left file it thinks the line in the right file came from, but it's often mistaken when lines are the same (e.g. a line with just a } in a cc file).

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I gave it a try under Wine, and it looks like it does the right thing. –  Ken Bloom Mar 22 '10 at 20:32

I just discovered psame in a google search which (at least algorithmically) does the same thing.

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