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I am trying to use JavaScript to remove all the elements with a certian name, but it is only removing the first one.

My code is:

var ele= document.getElementsByName("javascriptaudio");
for(var i=0;i<ele.length;i++)
{
  ele[i].parentNode.removeChild(ele[i]);
}

Can anyone tell me what is wrong?

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Oh, the beauty of working with live collections. Try deleting backwards. – Jan Dvorak Jul 6 '14 at 12:49
1  
consider using some kind of JS framework to get rid of that boilerplate (and potentially buggy!) code. e.g. in jQuery this is simply $("[name=javascriptaudio]").remove(); – Karoly Horvath Jul 6 '14 at 13:13
    
@karoly the alternative is to better understand what is going on and then code accordingly to that. Trust me, it's more satisfying and also produces code with fewer dependencies. – Jan Dvorak Jul 6 '14 at 13:20
    
@JanDvorak: Trust you lol. Abstractions are precisely there to not worry about these details. If I read code, I want to see high level functions describing what's done, not the guts, a bloody loop.... If you want to know more about it, that's fine (and it might even be satisfying to you). And if you build a framework/library, you should. But if you are an average developer, that's the best advice I could give. Every self respecting developer would happily introduce some kind of depencendy to get rid of that kind of boiler-plate code. – Karoly Horvath Jul 6 '14 at 14:39

I don't have enough rep to comment on Álvaro G. Vicario. The reason that it works is that the element is removed from ele when it is removed from the DOM. Weird.

The following code should work equally well:

var ele= document.getElementsByName("javascriptaudio");
len = ele.length;
parentNode = ele[0].parentNode;
for(var i=0; i<len; i++)
{
  parentNode.removeChild(ele[0]);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
In JavaScript, objects are always passed by reference. Removing an element removes it from everywhere :) – Álvaro González Jul 6 '14 at 15:23

Try removing them backwards:

var ele = document.getElementsByName("javascriptaudio");
for(var i=ele.length-1;i>=0;i--)
{
    ele[i].parentNode.removeChild(ele[i]);
}

The problem is that removing elements from ele shifts indexes: if you have 5 items (0 to 4) and remove item 0 you then have 4 items ranging from 0 to 3 (4 becomes 3, 3 becomes 2, etc.); you should then remove item 0 but your i variable has already incremented to 1.

share|improve this answer
2  
This answer is correct, but could use some explanation to help the OP and future readers know why. – JAAulde Jul 6 '14 at 12:48
2  
You're right, I'm afraid I was called for lunch when I had merely typed the code. I've edited my answer. – Álvaro González Jul 6 '14 at 13:53

you need to save length of array outside the loop because it is evaluated with each pass if you place it inside loop criteria. That way you will have correct amount of iterations. Furthermore you need to delete first item in loop each time because with each pass you lose 1 item so you will be outside of range at the end of process.

var ele = document.getElementsByName("javascriptaudio");
var elementsCount = ele.length;
for(var i=0;i<ele.length;i++){
    ele[0].parentNode.removeChild(ele[0]);
}
share|improve this answer

Try the following jQuery code:

$("[name=javascriptaudio]").remove();
share|improve this answer
    
And in plain JS? – putvande Jul 6 '14 at 12:43
1  
Who said jQuery was available? – Jan Dvorak Jul 6 '14 at 12:46
2  
should be a (decent) comment. – Karoly Horvath Jul 6 '14 at 13:12

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