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I have created a class that Tokenizes and string input. It converts the components of a string into a queue of strings as follows:

queue<string> Fraction::Tokenize( const string & infixExpression )
{
    queue<string> tokens;
    string currentToken;

    for( char currentChar : infixExpression )
    {
       currentToken += currentChar;
    }

    tokens.push(currentToken);
    return tokens;
}

This is the function that takes queue as a parameter:

Fraction evaluateInfix( queue<string> & infixQueue )
{
//code goes here
}

However, when I call these functions from a constructor:

Fraction::Fraction( const string &infix )
{
    queue<string> myQueue = Tokenize(infix);
    *this = evaluateInfix(myQueue);
}

I get the following error:

Fraction.cpp:(.text+0x1fd): undefined reference to `Fraction::evaluateInfix(std::queue < std::string, std::deque < std::string, std::allocator < std::string > > > &)'

and cannot for the life of me figure out why. Thanks for any help.

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closed as off-topic by Alan Stokes, juanchopanza, Captain Obvlious, shuttle87, T.C. Jul 6 '14 at 23:05

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your member function definition is missing the class' scope:

Fraction Fraction::evaluateInfix( queue<string> & infixQueue )
         ^^^^^^^^^^
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Oh my god. I cannot believe how much time I spent trying to figure this out. I thought maybe it had to do with the queue somehow using a different container in the two functions (deque vs list). The return type was blinding me to the missing scope. Your help is much appreciated! –  gstanley Jul 6 '14 at 22:09

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