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I am aware that it is valid to create a try-catch segment without a finally block. So in hacking around with this code, I can't figure out what java logic (e.g. rule, theory) forces me to include a finally block in this segment of code - and why the finally block has to include a return statement in it. In other words, if I remove the finally block completely I receive an error, and if I replace the return statement in the finally block with anything else (e.g. System.out.printl(''foo")), I still receive an error insisting that I include a return statement. Again, the code as written here compiles and runs fine. I'm just trying to understand a little bit of the theory behind the try-catch-finally construct (p.s. I understand that its all about "exception handling"... but my question is really more about code flow and the return statement).

class foo {
    int getInt() {
        try {
            String[] students = {"student1", "student2"};
            System.out.println(students[4]);
        }
        catch (Exception e) {
            return 10;
        }
        finally {
            return 20;
        }
    }
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        foo classSize = new foo();
        System.out.println(classSize.getInt());
    }
}
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4  
The trick is to read the error message. Without finally block, if there is no exception, what does the method return? –  JB Nizet Jul 6 at 22:10
    
The return 20 could just as well fall outside the try/catch, at the end of the method, or at the end of the try block. There's nothing wrong with how it's done above, though. –  Hot Licks Jul 6 at 22:14
    
Having a finally block fixes a compile, but logically it is a mistake. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 6 at 22:15
    
(My preference would be at the end of the method. Or place a comment there indicating where the return is assumed to occur.) –  Hot Licks Jul 6 at 22:15
4  
Someone is giving you a trick question. Does the 20 in the finally block, which will be executed after the catch block, replace the 10? [Hint: yes] return in finally blocks is legal but a bad idea. –  Andrew Lazarus Jul 6 at 22:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Consider the execution paths without the finally

int getInt() {
    try {
        String[] students = {"student1", "student2"};
        System.out.println(students[4]);
        // no return
    }
    catch (Exception e) {
        return 10; // if an exception occurs 
    }
    // no return
}

So what happens if no exception is thrown? You won't have a return value.

You can either provide a finally and put a return there or you can put a return outside the try-catch block.

Note that the finally in your try-catch-finally block has a return statement that will supersede the catch's return statement since a finally block is always executed if its associated try[-catch] is executed. You may want to go with the following

int getInt() {
    try {
        String[] students = {"student1", "student2"};
        System.out.println(students[4]);
        // the return could be here as well
    }
    catch (Exception e) {
        return 10; // in case of failure
    }
    return 20; // in case of success
}

All execution paths must end up returning a value (or throwing an exception).

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3  
or put a return at the end of the try block (the most natural place to me) –  JB Nizet Jul 6 at 22:11
    
So if an error occurs, then the final block does not execute because the catch block already returns a value. Is this correct? –  bbalchev Jul 6 at 22:18
3  
@bbalchev: no. A finally block always executes. That's the whole point of a finally block. –  JB Nizet Jul 6 at 22:18
    
Alright, thanks. It's always good to learn from tricky questions as well. –  bbalchev Jul 6 at 22:20
1  
@vee Are you referring to the first code snippet? Note how it says "Consider the execution paths without the finally". It's not meant to compile. It demonstrates why it fails if there is no finally (or other return statement). –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jul 6 at 22:26

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