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I'm writing a simple password program, but the else if statement always applies, even if the password is put in correctly. This works fine if I use a single char instead of an array, and change "hotdog" to 'h', and I think it might have something to do with unseen characters, like a space or return. I was sure cin.ignore() took care of return/enter. Sorry, I'm fairly new to programming.

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::cout << "What is the password?\n" << std::endl;
    char password[20] = "NULL";
    std::cin >> password;
    std::cin.ignore();
    std::cout << password << " is your entry?\n";
    if (password == "hotdog")
    {
        std::cout << "Correct!";
    }
    else if (password != "hotdog")
    {
        std::cout << "Incorrect!";
    }
    else
    {
    }        
    std::cin.get();
}
share|improve this question
    
You are comparing pointers to strings instead of the strings. Use strcmp(). If that wasn't for passwords, std::string might be even better. –  Deduplicator Jul 7 at 1:17
4  
You probably want to use std::string instead of an array of char. This will let == do a sensible comparison (right now it's just comparing pointers, so it'll always be false because the string literal can't be at the same address as the array). Oh, and no don't use strcmp if you can avoid it (and you can). –  Jerry Coffin Jul 7 at 1:17
3  
1. Use std::strcmp to compare C-style strings. 2. Better, use std::string instead of C-style strings. –  Yu Hao Jul 7 at 1:17
    
Are you sure? That is for a password, not normal text. –  Deduplicator Jul 7 at 1:18
3  
@Deduplicator: If all code had to be written the "right" way, then nobody could ever learn anything useful. The problem here is clearly "how do I compare strings in C++", rather than "what are the best practices for writing a program that accepts and verifies passwords". –  Greg Hewgill Jul 7 at 1:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Firstly, change char password[20] to string password. This prevents a buffer overflow if they type in more than 20, and it enables you to use == for string comparison.

The code std::cin.ignore() ignores a single character. You want to actually ignore the entire remainder of the line. There is no way to ignore "everything else typed so far" because there may have been characters typed which are still buffered. In practice, it works well to treat input as a series of lines.

The most accurate way to ignore the rest of the line is to ignore all characters up to and including '\n', which appears in the input stream at the end of the line (by definition).

std::cin.ignore( std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n' );

which may require #include <limits>. Another way is to read a string and discard it:

std::string t;
std::getline( std::cin, t );  

NB. Check your understand of if...else . Once you have if ( condition ), then the next else will already get everything that was not in that condition. It's pointless to actually write else if ( !condition ); and your final else { block can never be entered, because the previous two conditions were exhaustive.

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Taught me alot, thank's Matt! And yes, I do understand if && else, but I guess I inserted it after 30 minutes of pondering just to see if it was eluding me somehow. Thank's again! –  user3810722 Jul 7 at 10:55

The problem is with how you are using the if-else statement. Try this code out:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
std::cout << "What is the password?\n" << std::endl;
char password[20] = "NULL";
std::cin >> password;
std::cin.ignore();
std::cout << password << " is your entry?\n";
if (stricmp("hotdog", password) == 0)
{
    std::cout << "Correct!";
}
else
{
    std::cout << "Incorrect!";
}
std::cin.get();
}
share|improve this answer
    
FYI, I tested this and it does give the correct results. –  user3299512 Jul 7 at 10:40

When I take your code and compile it, even the term hotdog does not work properly, I obtain the following:

What is the password?

hotdog
hotdog is your entry?
Incorrect!

As suggested above, a string is a better method and works as intended based on your requirements. Here is sample replacement code that works as intended (with this code spaces are allowed, with the other answers, spaces are not, it all depends what is intended):

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main (int argc, char ** argv)
{
    cout << "What is the password?\n" << endl;
    string password = "NULL";
    getline(cin, password);
    cout << password.c_str() << " is your entry?\n";
    if (password == "hotdog")
    {
        cout << "Correct!";
    }
    else if (password != "hotdog")
    {
        cout << "Incorrect!";
    }
    else
    {
        // Added from original; however, this should never occur
        cout << "Else?";
    }
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

Output of Replacement Code

What is the password?

hotdog
hotdog is your entry?
Correct!
share|improve this answer

You had to use strcmp() function to compare strings properly in c++,so I added the cstring library:

 #include <iostream>
 #include <cstring>
 #include <string>

using namespace std;

int main(){

    string password;
    cin >> password;
    cout << password << " is your entry?\n";
    char hd [7] = "hotdog";
    if (strcmp(password.c_str(),hd) == 0){
        cout << "Correct!\n";
     }  
    else if (strcmp(password.c_str(),hd) != 0){
        cout << "Incorrect!\n";
     }
    else{
        cin.get();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
@GregHewgill sure –  Emma Jul 7 at 1:47
2  
It is not necessary to use strcmp() to compare strings in C++. Mixing C and C++ string functions like this is poor coding style. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 7 at 1:49

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