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I have a table that contains an even number of rows. The rows form pairs with the same information but the content of the first two columns swapped. Here is an example with three columns:

1  2  3
=======
A  B  W 
B  A  W
C  D  X
D  C  X
E  F  Y
H  G  Z
F  E  Y
G  H  Z

My actual table has many more columns, but the content is always the same within a pair.

I'm looking for an SQL-Statement that gets rid of one row of each pair. The result should look like this:

1  2  3
=======
A  B  W 
C  D  X
E  F  Y
G  H  Z

My table is generated by a script (which I can't change), so I assume my input is correct (every row has a partner, rows >=3 are the same for each pair). A statement that could check these preconditions would be extra cool.

share|improve this question
    
Which DBMS are you using? Postgres? Oracle? – a_horse_with_no_name Jul 7 '14 at 8:08
    
@a_horse_with_no_name Oracle 11g – bbuser Jul 7 '14 at 10:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

For Me the below code is working

DECLARE @TEST TABLE
(A CHAR(1),B CHAR(1),C CHAR(1))

INSERT INTO @TEST VALUES
('A','B','W'),
('B','A','W'),
('C','D','X'),
('D','C','X'),
('E','F','Y'),
('H','G','Z'),
('F','E','Y'),
('G','H','Z')

SELECT      MIN(A) [1],
            MAX(A) [2],
            C [3]
FROM        @TEST
GROUP BY    C

Result:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
I found time to try it out and it works perfectly, thanks Jithin Sshaji. – bbuser Jul 11 '14 at 8:38
    
Made this the accepted answer, because it is the shortest one that does the job. There are other answers that take different approaches and also work correctly. – bbuser Jul 11 '14 at 8:53

Something similar would help using ROWNUM and CTE

with test_Data as
(
SELECT COL1, COL2, COL3, ROWNUM ROWCOUNT FROM
(
SELECT 'A' COL1,  'B' COL2,  'W' COL3 FROM DUAL UNION
SELECT 'B' COL1,  'A' COL2,  'W' COL3 FROM DUAL UNION
SELECT 'C' COL1,  'D' COL2,  'X' COL3 FROM DUAL UNION
SELECT 'D' COL1,  'C' COL2,  'X' COL3 FROM DUAL 
) ORDER BY COL3, COL1
)
SELECT TAB1.COL1, TAB1.COL2, TAB1.COL3 FROM TEST_DATA TAB1, TEST_DATA TAB2
WHERE
TAB1.COL1 = TAB2.COL2
AND TAB1.COL2 = TAB2.COL1
AND TAB1.COL3 = TAB2.COL3
AND TAB1.ROWCOUNT = TAB2.ROWCOUNT+1;

Your query without testdata would be,

with CTE as
(SELECT COL1, COL2, COL3, ROWNUM ROWCOUNT FROM MY_TABLE ORDER BY COL3,COL1)
SELECT TAB1.COL1, TAB1.COL2, TAB1.COL3 FROM CTE TAB1, CTE TAB2
WHERE
TAB1.COL1 = TAB2.COL2
AND TAB1.COL2 = TAB2.COL1
AND TAB1.COL3 = TAB2.COL3
AND TAB1.ROWCOUNT = TAB2.ROWCOUNT+1;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the effort, I didn't try this one because the much shorter solution from FuzzyTree worked. – bbuser Jul 7 '14 at 8:50
    
I found time to try it out and it works perfectly, thanks Nishanthi Grashia. – bbuser Jul 11 '14 at 8:12
    
@bbuser: Thank you! Happy to help!! :-) – Nishanthi Grashia Jul 11 '14 at 8:22

You didn't state your DBMS so this is ANSI SQL:

select least(c1,c2), 
       greatest(c1,c2), 
       min(c3) -- choose min or max to your liking
from the_table
group by least(c1,c2), greatest(c1,c2)
share|improve this answer
    
I couldn't get this to work. If the statement works correctly the result should have exactly half of the rows of my original table. This statement produces much less rows. – bbuser Jul 7 '14 at 8:47
    
@bbuser: then you have more than two "duplicates" for the columns c1,c2 (something which is not visible from your sample data). Give your example it produces exactly what you showed as expected output: sqlfiddle.com/#!15/99eee/1 – a_horse_with_no_name Jul 7 '14 at 8:51
    
I found time to try it out and it works perfectly, thanks. My data actually had more than two "duplicates" and your SQL collapses them into one row. – bbuser Jul 11 '14 at 8:41

If every row has a counterpart where c1 and c2 are swapped then just select rows where c1 and c2 are in a certain order (i.e. c1 < c2).

The EXISTS part makes sure that only rows that have a counterpart are shown. If you want to show all unique rows regardless of whether or not they have a counterpart, then change the last condition from AND EXISTS to OR NOT EXISTS.

SELECT * FROM myTable t1
WHERE c1 < c2
AND EXISTS (
    SELECT * FROM myTable t2
    WHERE t2.c1 = t1.c2
    AND t2.c2 = t1.c1
    AND t2.c3 = t1.c3
) ORDER BY c1
share|improve this answer
1  
Works like a charm, thanks. – bbuser Jul 7 '14 at 8:46
    
This SQL statement gets rid of one member of every pair, even if there are duplicate pairs. So if I have two identical pairs with respect to the first three columns the result will have two rows with the statement from this answer. All other answers, so far, will have only one row as a result. It wasn't clear from my question if I wanted one or the other. – bbuser Jul 11 '14 at 8:49

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