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How do you define a variable inside of a GNU make macro? I am using GNU Make 4.0 and whenever I do an assignment the variable is empty:

define TEST_MACRO
    $(info $(1))
    test_var := $(1)
    $(info $(test_var))
endef

$(call TEST_MACRO,test)

Outputs:

test
(blank line)

I have tried using recursive expansion for the assignment but I get the same results.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You haven't mentioned which version of Make you're using, and there are subtle differences between versions in the handling of macros. But this works for me (using GNUMake 3.81):

define TEST_MACRO
    $(info A $(1))
    test_var := $(1)
    $$(info B $$(test_var))
endef

$(eval $(call TEST_MACRO,test))
share|improve this answer
    
I'm using GNU Make 4.0, I've updated the question with that information. –  Lerp Jul 7 '14 at 10:11
    
I tried that and it works, could you explain a bit as to why I have to escape and evaluate anything that isn't directly using the arguments? –  Lerp Jul 7 '14 at 10:25
1  
@Lerp: I hate to admit it, but I'm not actually sure why these things are necessary; they just work. –  Beta Jul 8 '14 at 4:30
2  
The reason it has to be this way is that the value will be expanded twice by make. First, the $(call ...) function will expand TEST_MACRO. Then, the $(eval ...) function will expand the result of the $(call ...) function. You can learn a bit about this by replacing the eval function with info. That will show you the result of the call function, that eval will evaluate. Try it both ways and see the difference. Without extra escaping, the info functions are expanded by call, before the variable is set by eval. –  MadScientist Jul 8 '14 at 15:09
1  
@MadScientist: That makes such perfect sense that I cannot figure out how I couldn't figure it out. –  Beta Jul 9 '14 at 2:28

I eventually went with something like this as I felt the double $ was messy.

define TEST_MACRO
   $(info B $(test_var))
endef

# Note test_var was defined after TEST_MACRO
test_var := test

$(eval $(value TEST_MACRO))

This has the disadvantage that you can't set the $1..$n variables but it's easier to read.


Edit - A better example of defining a variable inside of the macro. The above example was demonstrating how you would pass values into the macro, like you would with call

define TEST_MACRO
    test_var := test

    $(info B $(test_var))
endef
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I don't understand. Your original request was to define a variable inside a macro: this doesn't even come close to doing that?! I assume you left out the $ before (value ..., but even so this is just a confusing way to write $(info B $(test_var))... why bother with eval and value? –  MadScientist Jul 8 '14 at 15:06
    
I wanted too be able to define variables inside of a macro, the above does allow me to do so without having to double $ as that gets really confusing especially with bigger macros which is where I was heading with this. I'll add a better example. –  Lerp Jul 8 '14 at 22:07

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