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I read that using a wildcard with super like this:

public class MyClass <T extends Comparable<? super T>> {
   ...
}

instead of:

public class MyClass <T extends Comparable<T>> {
   ...
}

could make the class 'more generic', but I do not understand why.

Can someone provide some concrete examples?

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2  
possible duplicate of Java Generics: What is PECS? –  Trust Jul 7 at 11:16
    
possible duplicate of What is <? super T> syntax? –  Harry Blargle Jul 8 at 11:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This way you can supply a class for T, which does not for itself implements Comparable, but inherits from a class implementing Comparable.

E.g.

class Baseclass implements Comparable<Baseclass> {
...
}

class Inherited extends Baseclass {
...
}

With a specification like

public class MyClass <T extends Comparable<? super T>> {
...
}

you can use MyClass<Inherited>, and MyClass<Baseclass>, but with

public class MyClass <T extends Comparable<T>> {
...
}

you can only use MyClass<Baseclass>

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I actually tried that. I created a class Fruit which implements Comparable<Fruit> and 2 subclasses: Apple and Orange. Then, I tried to use a method written in this form <T extends Comparable<T>> (note that I used no super keyword) and it compared apples with oranges nevertheless. Do you have any idea why? It should not work according to your answer. –  Kami Jul 8 at 10:23
    
Here is my other question: stackoverflow.com/questions/24629547/… –  Kami Jul 8 at 11:09
    
@Kami You will see that when your MyClass has getters and setters accepting or delivering Objects of type T. This will not work without super. –  Uwe Allner Jul 9 at 6:59

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