Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why I can use setcookie without any preparation while need a session_start() before using $_SESSION?And I think works they do are similar.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Because setcookie() defines a cookie to be sent along with the rest of the HTTP headers. That's a completely different thing than what session_start() does, e.g. creating a session or resuming the current one based on a session identifier passed via a GET or POST request, or passed via a cookie.

The first just adds something to the header and sends it to the browser, while the other gets the Session ID from $_COOKIEs or $_GET or $_POST and then tries finding the session file in the session_save_path and when found unserializing the values of it into $_SESSION and if not, create a new session, probably using setcookie in the process to set the Session Id.

See the chapter on Sessions in the PHP Manual.


Edit Like @Felix correctly points out below, the session is not necessarily saved in a file. It's not that important though, because the argument stays the same: session_start will find and (re-) initialize your session data, while setcookie just does what the name implies.

share|improve this answer
    
I have got it.Thanks for the quality answers. –  Young Mar 17 '10 at 11:21
add comment

For explanation see the reply before mine. If you just don't want to call the start_session() function have a look at this setting in the php.ini: session.auto_start

share|improve this answer
add comment

The session data is not necessarily stored in a file as Gordon says. With session_set_save_handler() you can define your own backend that should store the values, e.g. in a database.

All this data retrieving is handled with session_start(). This way you can easily change you backend without breaking your application.

Note: This is only one reason for session_start(), and again it does lot more then just setting cookies.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The session data is not necessarily stored in a file as Gordon says. With session_set_save_handler() you can define your own back end that should store the values, e.g. in a database.

All this data retrieving is handled with session_start(). This way you can easily change you back end without breaking your application.

Note: This is only one reason for session_start(), and again it does lot more then just setting cookies.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.