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I'm reading a bit of asp code, and I can't figure out what if <> (whatevernumber) means.

Is <> equal to, or is it different from maybe? I can't Google this issue, as it doesn't search for symbols..

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3  
It means Not equal to, eg != see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9hck4s70(v=vs.84).aspx –  user574632 Jul 7 at 13:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"<>" is a comparison. You have to put a number or variable on each side. Like: "Hey computer! Compare x with z and tell me if they are not equal!" You would type it like this:

if (x<>z) then response.write ("hey x and z are not equal! Gimme ten dollars!")
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As given, the code fragment is a sytax error:

>> If <> 6
>>
Error Number:       1002
Error Description:  Syntax error

It's missing an operand to compare to and a Then. "<>" is the not equal to/different operator:

>> If 6 <> 6 Then WScript.Echo "different" : Else WScript.Echo "equal to" : End If
>>
equal to
>> If 7 <> 6 Then WScript.Echo "different" : Else WScript.Echo "equal to" : End If
>>
different
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This should be the accepted answer but I guess Ekkehard's lack of explanation has let him down. –  Lankymart Jul 9 at 10:19
    
@Lankymart - what explanation should I add to improve the answer? –  Ekkehard.Horner Jul 9 at 10:27
    
It's an approach I see you use a lot, copy paste your own tests and expect people to understand them. That's OK for seasoned programmers but not everyone is going to understand the formats you post. At this point I would like to point out that I up-voted your answer. +1 –  Lankymart Jul 9 at 10:29
    
@Lankymart - thanks, but what should I change/add to really deserve your upvote? –  Ekkehard.Horner Jul 9 at 10:37
    
Nothing, your answer makes sense to me, my point is merely it might not to others. As the OP is asking about what the operator <> means it's a fair bet they are not a seasoned programmer and struggle to interpret your code tests. –  Lankymart Jul 9 at 10:40

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