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Here is a sample dataframe called newdf. AA, AB, AC etc. are rownames:

      value    c1    c2    c3    c4
AA    0.875 0.750 0.750 0.625 1.000
AB    1.000 1.000 0.812 0.562 0.375
AC    0.625 0.812 0.667 0.812 0.750
AD    0.375 0.625 0.938    NA 0.875
AE       NA 0.500 0.542 0.938 0.500
BA    1.000 0.958 0.875 0.875 1.000
BB    0.875 0.938 0.812 1.000 0.562
BC    0.750 0.708 0.750    NA 0.500
BD    0.500 0.333 0.750    NA 0.625
BE       NA 0.208 0.500    NA 0.250
CA       NA 0.938 1.000 0.562    NA
CB       NA    NA    NA 0.938 0.812
CC    1.000 1.000 0.750 1.000 1.000
CD    0.938 0.812    NA    NA    NA
CE       NA 0.688 0.875    NA 0.938
DA       NA    NA 0.625 1.000    NA
DB       NA    NA 1.000 0.375 0.625
DC       NA    NA 0.750 0.625 1.000
DD       NA    NA    NA    NA    NA
DE       NA 1.000 0.500 0.750 0.750
EA    1.000    NA    NA 0.375    NA
EB    0.875    NA    NA 0.750 1.000
EC    0.250    NA 1.000 1.000    NA
ED    0.000    NA    NA    NA    NA
EE       NA    NA    NA    NA    NA

I wish to use apply over rows. I know how to do this quite simply, if my function argument is consistent.

For example, I wish to know how many times c1,c2,c3,c4 are >0.9, I would do this by row:

z<-newdf[-1]
apply(z, 1, function(x)  sum(x >= 0.9, na.rm=T)) #how many columns are >= 0.9

#AA AB AC AD AE BA BB BC BD BE CA CB CC CD CE DA DB DC DD DE EA EB EC ED EE 
# 1  1  0  1  1  2  2  0  0  0  2  1  3  0  1  1  1  1  0  1  0  1  2  0  0 

However, what I really want to know is how many columns from c1 onwards are greater than the value stored in the first variable/column of newdf. I tried this, which returns garbage:

value<-newdf[,1]
apply(z, 1, function(x)  sum(x >= value, na.rm=T)) #how many columns are >= value

I tried passing extra arguments to the function similar to the apply help pages but am not getting it right.

#

example data:

 newdf<-structure(list(value = structure(c(0.875, 1, 0.625, 0.375, NA, 
 1, 0.875, 0.75, 0.5, NA, NA, NA, 1, 0.938, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, 
 NA, 1, 0.875, 0.25, 0, NA), .Dim = 25L, .Dimnames = list(c("AA", 
 "AB", "AC", "AD", NA, "BA", "BB", "BC", "BD", NA, NA, NA, "CC", 
 "CD", NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, "EA", "EB", "EC", "ED", NA))), 
     c1 = structure(c(0.75, 1, 0.812, 0.625, 0.5, 0.958, 0.938, 
     0.708, 0.333, 0.208, 0.938, NA, 1, 0.812, 0.688, NA, NA, 
     NA, NA, 1, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA), .Dim = 25L, .Dimnames = list(
         c("AA", "AB", "AC", "AD", "AE", "BA", "BB", "BC", "BD", 
         "BE", "CA", NA, "CC", "CD", "CE", NA, NA, NA, NA, "DE", 
         NA, NA, NA, NA, NA))), c2 = structure(c(0.75, 0.812, 
     0.667, 0.938, 0.542, 0.875, 0.812, 0.75, 0.75, 0.5, 1, NA, 
     0.75, NA, 0.875, 0.625, 1, 0.75, NA, 0.5, NA, NA, 1, NA, 
     NA), .Dim = 25L, .Dimnames = list(c("AA", "AB", "AC", "AD", 
     "AE", "BA", "BB", "BC", "BD", "BE", "CA", NA, "CC", NA, "CE", 
     "DA", "DB", "DC", NA, "DE", NA, NA, "EC", NA, NA))), c3 = structure(c(0.625, 
     0.562, 0.812, NA, 0.938, 0.875, 1, NA, NA, NA, 0.562, 0.938, 
     1, NA, NA, 1, 0.375, 0.625, NA, 0.75, 0.375, 0.75, 1, NA, 
NA), .Dim = 25L, .Dimnames = list(c("AA", "AB", "AC", NA, 
"AE", "BA", "BB", NA, NA, NA, "CA", "CB", "CC", NA, NA, "DA", 
"DB", "DC", NA, "DE", "EA", "EB", "EC", NA, NA))), c4 = structure(c(1, 
0.375, 0.75, 0.875, 0.5, 1, 0.562, 0.5, 0.625, 0.25, NA, 
0.812, 1, NA, 0.938, NA, 0.625, 1, NA, 0.75, NA, 1, NA, NA, 
NA), .Dim = 25L, .Dimnames = list(c("AA", "AB", "AC", "AD", 
"AE", "BA", "BB", "BC", "BD", "BE", NA, "CB", "CC", NA, "CE", 
NA, "DB", "DC", NA, "DE", NA, "EB", NA, NA, NA)))), .Names = c("value", 
"c1", "c2", "c3", "c4"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c("AA", 
"AB", "AC", "AD", "AE", "BA", "BB", "BC", "BD", "BE", "CA", "CB", 
"CC", "CD", "CE", "DA", "DB", "DC", "DD", "DE", "EA", "EB", "EC", 
"ED", "EE"))
share|improve this question
    
Seems like rowSums(newdf[,-1]>=newdf[, 1], na.rm=T) would be more appropriate. But what's your expectation when value==NA? –  MrFlick Jul 7 '14 at 14:48
    
@MrFlick Thanks for that catch - if the observed value is NA, then the returned result from the function should also be NA. –  jalapic Jul 7 '14 at 14:51
    
@MrFlick, post this comment as an answer, it is certainly better than using a for loop –  David Arenburg Jul 7 '14 at 14:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't really need an apply here. It can be more efficient to use something like

rowSums(newdf[,-1]>=newdf[, 1], na.rm=T)

though here the na.rm=T will turn rows where value==NULL into 0. To return those rows to NA, you would do

rr<-rowSums(newdf[,-1]>=newdf[, 1], na.rm=T)
is.na(rr)<-is.na(newdf[,1])
rr

to get

AA AB AC AD AE BA BB BC BD BE CA CB CC CD CE DA DB 
 1  1  4  3 NA  1  2  1  2 NA NA NA  3  0 NA NA NA 
DC DD DE EA EB EC ED EE 
NA NA NA  0  1  2  0 NA 
share|improve this answer

when you are using apply on a row, within your function, the 'x' is a list of the elements in the row, so,

> newdf
   value    c1    c2    c3    c4
AA 0.875 0.750 0.750 0.625 1.000
AB 1.000 1.000 0.812 0.562 0.375
AC 0.625 0.812 0.667 0.812 0.750
AD 0.375 0.625 0.938    NA 0.875
AE    NA 0.500 0.542 0.938 0.500
BA 1.000 0.958 0.875 0.875 1.000
BB 0.875 0.938 0.812 1.000 0.562
BC 0.750 0.708 0.750    NA 0.500
BD 0.500 0.333 0.750    NA 0.625
BE    NA 0.208 0.500    NA 0.250
CA    NA 0.938 1.000 0.562    NA
CB    NA    NA    NA 0.938 0.812
CC 1.000 1.000 0.750 1.000 1.000
CD 0.938 0.812    NA    NA    NA
CE    NA 0.688 0.875    NA 0.938
DA    NA    NA 0.625 1.000    NA
DB    NA    NA 1.000 0.375 0.625
DC    NA    NA 0.750 0.625 1.000
DD    NA    NA    NA    NA    NA
DE    NA 1.000 0.500 0.750 0.750
EA 1.000    NA    NA 0.375    NA
EB 0.875    NA    NA 0.750 1.000
EC 0.250    NA 1.000 1.000    NA
ED 0.000    NA    NA    NA    NA
EE    NA    NA    NA    NA    NA

> apply(newdf,1,function(x) sum(x[-1] >= x[1],na.rm=T)) # the -1 removes the first element from the sum, and the x[1] is the value of the first element in the row
AA AB AC AD AE BA BB BC BD BE CA CB CC CD CE DA DB DC DD DE EA EB EC ED EE 
 1  1  4  3  0  1  2  1  2  0  0  0  3  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1  2  0  
share|improve this answer

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