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While practicing function with initalizer_list, I am following closely on the book example (on C++ Primer ) Need help to debug why it fails:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <cassert>
#include <iomanip>
#include <initializer_list>

using std::cout;   using std::endl;
using std::cin;    using std::cerr;  
using std::begin;  using std::end;           /* lib begin and end function (for arrays) */
using std::vector;
using std::string; using std::setw;  
using std::left;   using std::right;         /* align print out result */
using std::initializer_list;

void error_msg(initializer_list<string> il) {
  for(const auto &elem : il)
    cout << elem << " ";
  cout << endl;

}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

  string expected = "Hello", actual = "There";

  error_msg("FunctionX: ", expected, actual);

  return 0;

}

It get compile error:

g++ -O0 testerrormsg.cpp -lm -o testerrormsg -g -Wall -lpthread -std=c++11
testerrormsg.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, char**)’:
testerrormsg.cpp:27:44: error: could not convert ‘(const char*)"FunctionX: "’ from ‘const char*’ to ‘std::initializer_list<std::basic_string<char> >’

Also, may i ask a couple questions, since it is initializer_list related:

  1. Note in the above code example (which comes from the book), the arguments are of type "char *, std::string, std::string". So, does it mean that as long as all the arguments are implicitly convertible to the declared std::string type (in the foo declaration), it is legal?
  2. (From the book)"An initializer_list is a library type that represents an array of values". I never see such wording before. What difference does an array of values have compared to an array of objects?

Thanks in advance.

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2  
An initializer list must be enclosed in braces. –  Brian Jul 7 at 17:05
    
You should use error_msg({"FunctionX: ", expected, actual});. –  Jarod42 Jul 7 at 17:06
1  
@localhost What is it with you and the stupid edits marking everything with [tag:...]? Please stop! –  Praetorian Jul 7 at 17:10
    
Do you really write using for each standard symbol that you use? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 7 at 19:00
1  
@localhost: I agree with Praetorian; stop writing tags into prose. They do not belong there. This particular example is absolutely ridiculous. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 7 at 19:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The language allows deduction of an initializer_list<T> from a braced-init-list, which your code is missing. Change the call to error_msg to

error_msg({"FunctionX: ", expected, actual});

Live demo


So, does it mean that as long as all the arguments are implicitly convertible to the declared std::string type (in the foo declaration), it is legal?

Once you fix the function call, that's exactly what it means.

What difference does an array of values have compared to an array of objects?

I don't think there's any difference in this context. The standard describes the behavior of an initializer_list<T> (§8.5.4/5) as if the implementation has allocated a temporary array containing N elements of type const T. The initializer_list<T> then provides pointers (iterators) to the first and one beyond the last elements of this array.

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@user3701346 I've updated the answer to address your edit. –  Praetorian Jul 7 at 17:22

Because you're not passing an initializer list, you are passing three different arguments.

Instead do

error_msg({ "FunctionX: ", expected, actual });  // Note the curly-braces
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