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What is difference of below escape sequences for white space?

\t, \n, \x0B, \f and \r.

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What are you talking about? Those characters in the source code? In Strings? In String literals? –  Joachim Sauer Mar 17 '10 at 11:06
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Looks like you left out the operators, but I'm interpreting you to want to know how various Java APIs handle those characters.

The Java handling of these characters is determined by their Unicode character properties. See the Unicode spec to see what properties they have, and thus what the different functions in Character return for them.

www.unicode.org will tell you all you ever wanted to know about Unicode properties.

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where i have to refer those stuff? –  Praveen Mar 17 '10 at 11:05
    
    
Since when is a tab, line feed, vertical tab, and carriage return a space? –  Steve Kuo Mar 17 '10 at 15:05
    
@Steve Kuo, in the terminology of the questions, they were more spaces than operators. Point taken. –  bmargulies Mar 18 '10 at 0:24
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  • \t      The tab character (\u0009)
  • \n      The newline (line feed) character (\u000A)
  • \r      The carriage-return character (\u000D)
  • \f      The form-feed character (\u000C)
  • \x0B  The vertical tabulation (VT) character
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\x0B is not space \x20 is the space. –  codaddict Mar 17 '10 at 11:08
    
@codaddict - you're right. It's the vertical tabulation character. Just edited it. Thanks –  b.roth Mar 17 '10 at 11:12
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\t - Horizontal tab
\n - New line
\x0B - Vertical tab
\f - form feed
\r - carriage return
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