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What load can azure table storage handle at most (one account)? For example can it handle 2000 reads/sec, where response must come in less than a second (requests would be made from many different machines and the payload of one entity is something like 500Kb on average)? What are the practices to accommodate for such load (how many tables, partitions, giving that there is only one type of entity and in principle there could be any number of table/partitions. Also the Rowkeys are uniformly distributed 32 character hash strings and PartitionKeys are also uniformly distributed).

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Thomas Jungblut, Yan Sklyarenko, Gamb, aliteralmind, zx81 Sep 4 '14 at 5:16

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Check the Azure Storage Scalability and Performance Targets documentation page. That should answer part of your question.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/azure/dn249410.aspx

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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Fernando Correia Jul 8 '14 at 17:37

I would suggest reading the best practices here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazurestorage/archive/2010/11/06/how-to-get-most-out-of-windows-azure-tables.aspx

The following are the scalability targets for a single storage account:

•Transactions – Up to 5,000 entities/messages/blobs per second

Single Table Partition – a table partition are all of the entities in a table with the same partition key value, and most tables have many partitions. The throughput target for a single partition is:

◦Up to 500 entities per second

◦Note, this is for a single partition, and not a single table. Therefore, a table with good partitioning, can process up to a few thousand requests per second (up to the storage account target).

As long as you correctly partition your data so you don't have a bunch of data all going to one machine, one table should be fine. Also keep in mind how you will query the data, if you don't use the index (PartitionKey|RowKey) it will have to do a full table scan which is very expensive with a large dataset.

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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Fernando Correia Jul 8 '14 at 17:38

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