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I have written a dummy (ram disk) block device driver for linux kernel. When the driver is loaded, I can see it as /dev/mybd.

I can successfully transfer data onto it using dd command, compare the copied data successfully.

The problem is that when I create ext2/3 filesystem on it, I have to use -o loop option with the mount command. Otherwise mount fails with following result:

mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on mybd, missing codepage or helper program, or other error

What could be the problem? Please help.

Thanks.

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Post your driver unit and request routines? I have a ramdisk driver but have not seen this error, maybe seeing the code will help. –  Sam Post Mar 17 '10 at 12:48
    
aah.. just crashed my linux system.. did a dd on wrong device! Need to start over again from installing linux... I will get back here if I can reproduce the problem. Thanks. –  user295631 Mar 17 '10 at 12:54
    
Take a look at: user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net You can run a Linux within a Linux system. That would allow you to quickly build and 'deploy' a new version of plugin. And all the changes you would do (eg. dd) would be done within the guest OS, so it wouldn't break your native OS. As I remember there was even a possibility to have a delta of your file system changes in a separate file, so you could easily restore the initial state of your guest file system. –  Grzegorz Oledzki Mar 17 '10 at 14:49
    
Thanks, I will try this too. –  user295631 Mar 18 '10 at 16:22
    
Any luck reproducing this error? Interested to see what the issue is... –  Sam Post Mar 20 '10 at 4:18

4 Answers 4

Hmm, if it works with -o loop and doesn't work without, then I have bad news for you: your "device" is actually just a plain file in /dev. What does ls -l /dev/mybd show? If its filesize is non-zero, it's a regular file, and has nothing to do with your driver.

Use mknod to create the device file yourself if needed.

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I see you're starting over again. As a quick note about your previous attempt, did you make sure your device appeared in /dev as a block device and not a character one?

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Create a filesytem on the device before mounting it:

mkfs -t ext2 /dev/mybd

or

mke2fs /dev/mybd
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I have already done that. –  user295631 Mar 17 '10 at 12:28
1  
Try checking dmesg or /var/log/messages...sometimes the kernel writes diagnostic info there. –  Doug Mar 17 '10 at 12:43
    
aah.. just crashed my linux system.. did a dd on wrong device! Need to start over again from installing linux... I will get back here if I can reproduce the problem. Thanks. –  user295631 Mar 17 '10 at 12:54

The loop device is used to mount block special files on the linux filesystem emulating them as block devices. Hence, the mount throws error.

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