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In the past I've done quite a bit in javascript, including some DOM manipulation. From there I've learned that reflows/repaints can be a big performance issue in some cases, and should generally be limited to a minimum. Like for example when adding a group of divs you should add all at once (attach them to a div outside of the DOM, then attach that) rather than attaching them one-by-one. The same goes for repaints, which can be triggered by changing CSS properties of an element. Though I must admit I have never looked into repaints that much, so I might be wrong about that last part.

Does this also apply to SVG (seeing it uses a kind of DOM it seems plausible)? And is there a difference for different SVG elements? For example it would make sense that an animation element doesn't create a reflow since it isn't a new SVG element, but more like a property.

Something I'm not sure about are repaints for SVG, do they even exist the same way they do for CSS/HTML? After all SMIL animations already create frames, so a thing like a "repaint" might not make any difference, since the new frame was going to be rendered anyways.

Anyone with a deeper understanding of the inner workings of SMIL who could clarify these things for me?

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Your information is out of date. UAs batch up reflows these days so that you don't need to attach divs outside the DOM any more.

SVG doesn't really have reflows as it's basically all absolutely positioned so changing the position of one element only has an effect on that element and any descendants. SVG DOM changes just cause repaints. Sometimes even repaints are not necessary if the appropriate data is in graphics memory, for instand translate transforms are often handled almost entirely by the graphics hardware renderer without repainting these days. SMIL animation is also hooked into this mechanism.

If SVG content has a translate attribute it is stored in a separate layer. Layers can be updated without rerendering in many cases e.g. translation as graphics system can just draw the layers where they need to go.

There's more documentation about how this works in Firefox here but other UAs work in a similar fashion.

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"Sometimes even repaints are not necessary if the appropriate data is in graphics memory" is this along the lines of "a repaint might not make any difference, since the new frame was going to be rendered anyways"? And does the part about translates mean that there is literally no difference (repaint/performance-wise) between a JS-controlled translate change, and say a change made by an SVG <animate> tag? –  Wingblade Jul 8 at 16:11
    
Also: Is there any rule what causes SVG data to end up in graphics memory? –  Wingblade Jul 8 at 16:16
    
SMIL can be extra optimised as the UA knows what's going to happen. Sometimes that can make it faster but it's too broad to answer in detail here. SVG data always ends up in graphics memory, it's whether when you change it you can assemble the new layout that counts e.g. for a translate you need to have the background and the thing being translated in separate buffers. –  Robert Longson Jul 8 at 16:31
    
"SMIL can be extra optimised as the UA knows what's going to happen." Exactly what I thought. In general SMIL seems just more "natural" for the UA than say having a timeout or requestAnimationFrame that changes properties of an element. Thanks for your answers, they were very helpful. –  Wingblade Jul 8 at 19:05
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To anyone else reading this: This article may also be helpful. –  Wingblade Jul 8 at 22:30

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