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Say, I have two classes: A && B ; One Header file myheader.h :

....
class A{
public:
    void display(B* c);
};
class B{
public:
    void display(A* c);
};
.....

Compiler gave me error: 'B' has not been declared( in A::display )As expected.

So I wrote two separated headers for A and B: aheader.h(including definition of class A) and bheader.h(including class B);

In aheader.h:

#include "bheader.h"

In bheader.h:

#include "aheader.h"

so far, so good .

But the problem occurs when I start to write the implementation.cpp:

#include "aheader.h"
#include "bheader.h"
void A::display(B* c){}
void B::display(A* c){}

Now,A' has not been declared.(in B::display)

Don't know how to describe this problem in brief.

I'm using Ubuntu14,Eclipse CDT,Linux GCC & Gnu Makd Builder.

I'm new to C++,I guess this problem occurs when linking. And I really hope someone to give me an explanation or a solution. Thank you !

share|improve this question
    
Sounds like a declaration dependency issue though the problem can't completely be determined from what you've given above though. You need to list the files in full or at least a worked example showing the problem. –  Component 10 Jul 8 at 6:58
    
well @Component10 ,I built a completely new project including main.cpp,which has done nothing about these two classes,and a myheader.h file. Just two of them at first. Until I get the error,then I deleted this myheader.h file and wrote aheader.h && bheader.h and implementation.cpp file.Now I have four files including main.cpp(still does nothing),I get the same error. –  WALKER Jul 8 at 7:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is quite common when beginning with C / C++

The usual aproach in C++ is to have all the unrelated classes separated, each one in its own header file. Always (I mean it, ALWAYS) the header file MUST be protected against recursive inclusion. This is done by appending an IFDEF at the beginning of the header file, so the file is included only once:

I. e. file aheader.h:

#ifndef __AHEADER_H__
#define __AHEADER_H__

//All the header code comes here...

#endif

So when including the header file, the compiler will do the following:

  1. Is __AHEADER_H__ defined?
  2. It is not yet defined, so it compiles the header.
  3. The compiler defines __AHEADER_H__ now.
  4. If at any other point the file is included again:
  5. Is __AHEADER_H__ defined?
  6. Yes, don't compile again the header.

Ok, this is one part of your problem. But lets go to your actual problem.

You are having the error because, as the compiler tells you, the other class is not defined. In other words, the compiler does not know what A (or B) is. You cannot include "aheader.h" in "bheader.h", since this will throw the "B is not defined" error:

  1. bheader will include aheader
  2. aheader begins to be processed
  3. class A is found, which contains a method with a B parameter.
  4. What is B?
  5. Error here!

Of course, if you include them the other way (bheader.h included in aheader.h) the error would be "A is not defined", just with the same explanation.

The solution?

Just forward define the class:

In bheader.h:

#ifndef __BHEADER_H__
#define __BHEADER_H__

class A; //Forward definition. We don't have any member definition, just we are telling 
         //the compiler "Trust me, this is a class"

class B{
public:
   void display(A* c);
}
#endif

The same would have to be done in aheader.h.

And finally, in order to be able to use A or B in your implementation code, you should include the actual header file of the class.

file implementation.cpp:

#include "aheader.h"
#inlcude "bheader.h"
void A::display(B* c){}
//And so on...

Forward declaration can be used whenever you don't need to have the complete class definition (i.e.):

  • When a class is used only as the parameters or as the result of a funciton.
  • When a class is used only with a pointer.

You cannot have forward declaration when you need to have the complete class definition (i.e.):

  • When used as a class member.

By the way, the usual way of separating classes would be also to separate the implementation into one .cpp file per class, having at the end:

  • aheader.h
  • aheader.cpp
  • bheader.h
  • bheader.cpp
share|improve this answer

Instead of mutually including the header files in each other, use forward declarations. In aheader.h:

class B;

class A{
public:
    void display(B* c);
};

And in bheader.h:

class A;

class B{
public:
    void display(A* c);
};
share|improve this answer

First of all, you need in each class to protect the inclusion (so it doesn't get included more than once in any compile) and pre-declare the types that are parameters to your functions:

aheader.h

// This tells the precompiler only to incorporate this section if AHEADER_H is
// not defined so it should only happen once, even if you include aheader.h
// from many places.
#ifndef AHEADER_H 
#define AHEADER_H

class B; // This tells the compiler that B is a class but it doesn't need to
         // know more than that now.

class A{
public:
    void display(B* c);
};

#endif

bheader.h

#ifndef AHEADER_H
#define AHEADER_H

class A;

class B{
public:
    void display(A* c);
};

and don't include one from another - keep them entirely separate. You should then be able to include them in any order

Next you should probably keep seperate implementation files for each class:

aimp.cpp

#include <aheader.h>
#include <bheader.h> // Compiler now needs B in full as this is the
                     // implementation

void A::display(B* c)
{
    // Some stuff
}

bimp.cpp

#include <aheader.h>
#include <bheader.h> // Same here - the order is not important now.

void B::display(A* c)
{
    // Some stuff
}

Now you can create a third file, say main.cpp as follows:

#include <aheader.h>
#include <bheader.h>

int main()
{
    B b;
    A a;
    a.display(b);
    b.display(a);
    return 0;
}

The last step is to compile all three implementation files (.cpp) and link then together into an executable. Good luck.

share|improve this answer
1  
Wow! Thank you so much for detailed answer ! So the solution is simple: separate implementation ! hah! –  WALKER Jul 8 at 7:21

That's because when you include a file it will be copied into source file. After first include your implementation.cpp will look like (also presuming that you have used include guards):

#ifndef _AHEADER_H_
#define _AHEADER_H_

#include "bheader.h" 

class A{ public:
    void display(B* c); 
};
#endif //_AHEADER_H_

#include "bheader.h"

void A::display(B* c){}
void B::display(A* c){}

after second include

#ifndef _AHEADER_H_
#define _AHEADER_H_

#ifndef _BHEADER_H_
#define _BHEADER_H_

#include "bheader.h" 

class B{ public:
    void display(A* c); 
};
#endif //_BHEADER_H_

class A{ public:
    void display(B* c); 
};
#endif //_AHEADER_H_

#include "bheader.h"

void A::display(B* c){}
void B::display(A* c){}

The third include will also place the bheader.h but your include guard will prevent it to be executed.

As you can see in the decleration of class B, class A yet has not been declared before. If you want to define two classes in the same file you can do as;

//File class_declarations.h

#ifndef _CLASS_DECLARATIONS_H_
#define _CLASS_DECLARATIONS_H_
class B;

class A{ public:
    void display(B* c); 
};

class B{ public:
    void display(A* c); 
};

#endif //_CLASS_DECLARATIONS_H_

Now compiler knows that there is a class B which it will encounter later.

Note that if you try to use the exact class objects instead of pointers such as

class A{ public:
    void display(B c); 
};

forward declarations will do no good. There are other ways to overcome this problem.

share|improve this answer
    
"forward declarations will do no good." I tend to agree with that,even though it can solve the problem,even though I didn't know about it before. Just as Component10 said above, having a separated implementation for each class will do the job nicely. Thank you all so much ! –  WALKER Jul 8 at 7:40
    
even if you are separating the implementation files still you are doing forward declaration. But still separating the different classes is a better practice most of the time. By the way what i meant by forward declarations will do no good is forward declaring a pointer's type is what C++ accepts. But forward declaring an objects class still not acceptable to C++. Here is an example. –  Faruxx Jul 8 at 8:09
    
Yeah,I thought I could avoid using forward declaration if I separate the implementations,and it proved to be wrong. So the best practice ,I guess,is to avoid designing classes this way. –  WALKER Jul 8 at 8:51

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