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I have two modes that I want to switch between with an interrupt that is generated by a sliding switch. Initially I read the current position and choose a mode/function. I want to switch between the two right when the position of the switch is changed. I have an interrupt which occurs on both edges (whenever the position is changed). However since both functions run continuously in a while loop, I can't just call them in the interrupt. Basically I have something like this:

interrupt()
{
 //not sure how to switch between modes here
}

main()
{
  //choose mode on startup
  if (switch_HIGH)
    modeA();
  else
    modeB();
}

modeA()
{
    while(1)
    {
      //do something
    }
}

modeB()
{
    while(1)
    {
      //do something
    }
}

I don't know if it's a good idea to just leave a function where it is and just move to something else but I can't think of any other way to do it. I'd really appreciate it if someone could tell me how I can go about this. The language I'm using is C and the platform is a NIOS system on a Altera DE1 development board.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using an interrupt for this seems very pointless; it's much simpler to just poll the input on each loop, and call the proper function just as you're doing.

UPDATE: I just relized your code doesn't have a loop, so the above is a bit hard to understand, of course.

I meant that you can structure your program like this:

int main(void)
{
  initialize_hardware();
  while(1)
  {
    if(switch_HIGH)
      modeA();
    else
      modeB();
  }
}

This makes the CPU go around in an infinite loop, and on each iteration it checks the switch and calls either modeA() or modeB() depending on the current mode.

Adding an interrupt gains you nothing except adding more complexity.

That said, what I would do is use a function pointer to indicate the current mode, and change the function pointer's value inside the interrupt, depending on the state of the switch. Then in the main loop just call the pointed-at function.

Remember to initialize the function properly, since you probably won't get an interrupt when teh device comes out of reset. This is another argument against this solution; the complexity is much bigger than just checking the switch on each iteration.

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Thanks for the reply. Polling is what I was doing initially. The thing is that I call a subfunction to read a file which takes a few seconds. Then I would have to poll inside that function right? Is that considered poor programming practice? What you've said makes complete sense though. –  Ammar Jul 8 '14 at 8:50
    
@Ammar I added some code to illustrate how I meant you could organize your program. If e.g. modeB() takes a few seconds to run, you will still get to modeA() if you toggle the switch when its busy. If you meant that it should stop the current mode if the switch is toggled when the program is busy, then an interrupt is starting to make more sense ... Hard to know when you state your question in reverse. :) –  unwind Jul 8 '14 at 8:54
    
I'm sorry..maybe I should be more clear about this. Basically modeA takes input from a camera continuously and runs an algorithm. This is much faster than modeB which takes image input from an SD card. The function to read the image is what slows it down and the image data is read row by row. If I poll switch position inside that function at each row, I can exit quickly and probably achieve a desirable result. If the switch position is changed I want to stop the current mode and go to the other one right then. –  Ammar Jul 8 '14 at 9:04
    
So I went with polling after all and it works well enough. Thanks for your advice and sorry for the gibberish in my last comment! –  Ammar Jul 8 '14 at 16:44

How about calling the two functions as threads. The interrupt function can kill the active thread and start the other thread. Pseudo code:

thread threada,threadb;
flag a=0;
interrupt()
{
    if(a==0)
    {
        thread_kill(threada);
        threadb=thread_create(modeB);
        a=1;

    }
    else
    {
        thread_kill(threadb);
        threada=thread_create(modeA);
        a=0;

    }

}

main()
{
    thread_create(threada);
    a=1;
}

modeA()
{
    while(1)
    {
      //do something
    }
}

modeB()
{
    while(1)
    {
      //do something
    }
}

Rather than killing the thread, you can have graceful shutdown mechanism using some kind of synchronization.

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This is actually a good idea but I'm not completely sure how to implement it on the hardware platform I'm using. I decided to use polling at certain places to return from a mode quickly and go to the other one. Thanks for the advice though. I don't have enough rep to upvote or I would :( –  Ammar Jul 8 '14 at 16:46

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