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I have the following C code example:

int f(const int farg[const 5])
{
}

What does the additional const for the array size do? And what is the difference when I omit the const there?

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3  
Possibly related –  Kerrek SB Jul 8 at 8:42
    
the second const gave me 4 compiler errors –  mch Jul 8 at 8:46
2  
@mch make sure your compiler supports C99 or C11. (-std=c11 for example). clang 3.4 with -std=c11 eats this up without issue. –  WhozCraig Jul 8 at 8:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted
int d(const int darg[5])

Means darg is a pointer to const int.

int e(int earg[const 5])

Means earg is a const pointer to int. This is a c99 feature. T A[qualifier-list e] is equivalent as T * qualifier-list A in the parameter declaration.

And of course (from above):

int f(const int farg[const 5])

Means farg is a const pointer to const int.

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What does the additional const for the array size do?

C11: 6.7.6.3:

A declaration of a parameter as ‘‘array of type’’ shall be adjusted to ‘‘qualified pointer to type’’, where the type qualifiers (if any) are those specified within the [ and ] of the array type derivation.

This means

int f(const int farg[const 5])  

will be adjusted to

int f(const int *const farg)  

And what is the difference when I omit the const there?

After omitting, it is equivalent to

int f(const int frag[5])  //or int f(const int frag[])

which is ultimately equivalent to

int f(const int *farg)
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3  
const int farg[const 5] is adjusted to const int * const farg not to const int const *farg. –  ouah Jul 8 at 9:18
    
@ouah; Oopa!. That was a typo. It should be ‘‘qualified pointer to type’’ –  haccks Jul 8 at 9:22

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