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I want to write a method to trim characters from the end of a string. This is simple enough to do:

class String
  def trim(amount)
    self[0..-(amount+1)]
  end
end

my_string = "Hello"
my_string = my_string.trim(1) # => Hell

I would rather have this be an in-place method. The naive approach,

class String
  def trim(amount)
    self[0..-(amount+1)]
  end

  def trim!(amount)
    self = trim(amount)
  end
end

throws the error "Can't change the value of self: self = trim(amount)".

What is the correct way of writing this in-place method? Do I need to manually set the attributes of the string? And if so, how do I access them?

share|improve this question
    
All of the answers I receieved were great, and I am accepting @falsetru's answer as it most closely resembles my original intent. I will modify it to include both trim() and trim!(), but the principle stands. – Devon Parsons Jul 8 '14 at 13:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using String#[]=

class String
  def trim(amount)
    self[0..-1] = self[0..-(amount+1)]
  end
end

s = 'asdf'
s.trim(2) # => "as"
s # => "as"
share|improve this answer

You can use String#replace. So it could become:

class String
  def trim(amount)
    self[0..-(amount+1)]
  end

  def trim!(amount)
    replace trim(amount)
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer, but note that in trim!, replace trim(amount) is sufficient. – Cary Swoveland Jul 8 '14 at 19:40
    
@CarySwoveland fair call - I always tend to get a bit self obsessed when writing instance methods :) – theTRON Jul 8 '14 at 22:14

You can write as

class String
  def trim(amount)
    self.slice(0..-(amount+1))
  end

  def trim!(amount)
    self.slice!(-amount..-1)
    self
  end
end

my_string = "Hello"          
puts my_string.trim(1) # => Hell
puts my_string # => Hello

my_string = "Hello"          
puts my_string.trim!(1) # => Hell
puts my_string # => Hell

Read the String#slice and String#slice!

share|improve this answer
2  
"Hello".trim(1) should return "Hell" – Devon Parsons Jul 8 '14 at 13:36
1  
@DevonParsons I was customising your code.. and that time it - gone.. I didn't notice.. :-) That's a typo. I fixed. – Arup Rakshit Jul 8 '14 at 13:40

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