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Should I dispose GDI+ object before its creation?

Is recommended to always Dispose GDI+ object after using it.

by e.g.

Pen p = new Pen(Color.Green);
// use 'p'
p.Dispose();

now, if I have this situation:

Pen p = new Pen(Color.Green);
// use green 'p'

p = new Pen(Color.Red); // Should I Dispose my 'p' first?
// use red 'p'

p.Dispose();

EDIT A:

Using 'USING' is not possible every time.

private Pen p;

public RefreshPen(style)
{
    // p.Dispose(); +-
    p = new Pen(style.Color);
    // etc.
}

EDIT B:

Will this be OK?

using (Pen p = new Pen(Color.Green))
{
    // use green 'p'

    p = new Pen(Color.Red); // Should I Dispose my 'p' first?
    // use red 'p'

    p = new Pen(Color.Blue); // Should I Dispose my 'p' first?
    // use blue 'p'
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, you should. (Also note that the using statement is a tremendous help here. I very rarely call .Dispose explicitly. using takes care of that.)

share|improve this answer
    
maybe, but see my edit. by the way, you would say that 'using' will help disposing even in multiple consecutive object creations like in (green/red) example? –  serhio Mar 17 '10 at 15:25
    
+1. I wouldn't have a "RefreshPen" method like that because you it makes it hard to use a "using" statement. –  David Mar 17 '10 at 15:28
    
@David: What if you have a custom control and you draw(Paint) it with a pen, that should conditionally change a style? –  serhio Mar 17 '10 at 15:31
    
@serhio: you're edited code is waaay worng, I'm afraid. You should split that into three separate using-statements. –  Dan Byström Mar 17 '10 at 15:34
2  
@seriho: the difference is "just" more readable and robust code. But returning to your original question: YES, before setting "p" to a new pen, you should .Dispose() the old Pen first. –  Dan Byström Mar 17 '10 at 15:43

Yes. You are creating a new object and assigning it to p, which means you should dispose the old object.

I might code it like so:

using(Pen p = new Pen(Color.Green))
{
    //do some stuff
}

using(Pen q = new Pen(Color.Red))
{
    //do some other stuff
}

This prevents you from forgetting to dispose the pen, or using a disposed object.

share|improve this answer
    
maybe, but see my edit. –  serhio Mar 17 '10 at 15:25
    
@serhio - Not maybe... definitely yes. Even though you are assigning it to the same variable named 'p'... it is an entirely new object. The old one must be Disposed properly before doing the new Pen statement, because after you do that, you have lost the reference to the old Pen, and won't ever have the ability to call Dispose on it again. –  Nick Mar 17 '10 at 15:31
    
@Nick - "maybe" was for using 'using', that can't be combined with a private variable. –  serhio Mar 17 '10 at 15:33
    
@serhio - Actually, you can use using with a private variable. It will properly dispose of the Pen after the using block completes. However, if you attempt to make use of the Pen without reinitializing it somewhere else, it will throw an ObjectDisposedException. –  Nick Mar 17 '10 at 15:59

Can't you just change the properties of the object?

Pen p = new Pen(Color.Green);
//use it here.
p.Color = Color.Red;
//use it some more.
p.Dispose();
share|improve this answer
    
yes. you have reason, finally, I adopted this "strategy". Just as I formulated the question this is not an answer :) –  serhio Mar 17 '10 at 16:29

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