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Given 2 32bit ints iMSB and iLSB

int iMSB = 12345678; // Most Significant Bits of file size in Bytes
int iLSB = 87654321; // Least Significant Bits of file size in Bytes

the long long form would be...

// Always positive so use 31 bts
long long full_size =  ((long long)iMSB << 31);
          full_size += (long long)(iLSB);

Now..

I don't need that much precision (that exact number of bytes), so, how can I convert the file size to MiBytes to 3 decimal places and convert to a string...

tried this...

long double file_size_megs = file_size_bytes / (1024 * 1024);
char strNumber[20];
sprintf(strNumber, "%ld", file_size_megs);

... but dosen't seem to work.

i.e. 1234567899878Bytes = 1177375.698MiB ??

share|improve this question
    
How many bits of data are there in iLSB? This information is required to properly shift the iMSB value to its right place. Hopefully you also realize that you have initialized the variables with decimal values and after bit shifting the MSB part of that is going to be something completely different. – Tronic Mar 17 '10 at 16:04
1  
That shift of 31 bits instead of 32 seems awfully suspicious. – OldFart Mar 17 '10 at 16:05
    
@OldFart - the integers are signed, so only 31 bits are used in what is returned and put into iMSB and iLSB. They are the upper 31 bits and the lower 31 bits of the size. – Krakkos Mar 17 '10 at 16:33
    
@tronic - the number of bits in the iLSB is 31 – Krakkos Mar 17 '10 at 16:44
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You misunderstand how the operation works. Your computation should be:

// Always use 32 bits
long long full_size = ((long long)iMSB << 32); 
          full_size += (unsigned long long)(iLSB);

However, the combination of 12345678, 87654321 is not 1234567887654321; it's 53024283344601009.

Then when you do

long double file_size_megs = file_size_bytes / (1024 * 1024);
char strNumber[20];
sprintf(strNumber, "%ld", file_size_megs);

You are taking a long double (which is a floating point format) and printing it with %ld which is an integer format. What you meant was:

long long file_size_megs = file_size_bytes / (1024 * 1024);
char strNumber[20];
sprintf(strNumber, "%lld", file_size_megs);

An alternative is to compute just the filesize in MB:

long long file_size_megs = ((long long)iMSB << (32 - 20)) + ((unsigned)iLSB >> 20);
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for the bravery to answer to a such b0rked question. The values being signed may pose a difficulty, though. I would recommend simply making all integer variables unsigned to avoid such issues. – Tronic Mar 17 '10 at 16:06
    
this sprintfs the long long as a long, use %lld. – nos Mar 17 '10 at 16:07
    
Since this is marked C++, one should be using streams instead of sprintf anyway (and avoid those nasty formatting string bugs). – Tronic Mar 17 '10 at 16:09
    
I made the LSB unsigned and put in the %lld. Thanks Tronic and nos – Gabe Mar 17 '10 at 16:21
    
> @gabe However, the combination of 12345678, 87654321 is not 1234567887654321; it's 53024283344601009. yes I realise that. – Krakkos Mar 17 '10 at 16:29

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