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We maintain a DLL that does a lot of system-related things; traversing the file system, registry, etc. The callers of this DLL may or may not be using impersonation. In order to better support all possible scenarios I'm trying to modify it to be smarter. I'll use the example of deleting a file. Currently we just call DeleteFile(), and if that fails that's the end of that. I've come up with the following:

BOOL TryReallyHardToDeleteFile(LPCTSTR lpFileName)
{
    // 1. caller without privilege
    BOOL bSuccess = DeleteFile(lpFileName);
    DWORD dwError = GetLastError();
    if(!bSuccess && dwError == ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED)
    {
        // failed with access denied; try with privilege
        DWORD dwOldRestorePrivilege = 0;
        BOOL bHasRestorePrivilege = SetPrivilege(SE_RESTORE_NAME, SE_PRIVILEGE_ENABLED, &dwOldRestorePrivilege);
        if(bHasRestorePrivilege)
        {
            // 2. caller with privilege
            bSuccess = DeleteFile(lpFileName);
            dwError = GetLastError();
            SetPrivilege(SE_RESTORE_NAME, dwOldRestorePrivilege, NULL);
        }
        if(!bSuccess && dwError == ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED)
        {
            // failed with access denied; if caller is impersonating then try as process
            HANDLE hToken = NULL;
            if(OpenThreadToken(GetCurrentThread(), TOKEN_QUERY | TOKEN_IMPERSONATE, TRUE, &hToken))
            {
                if(RevertToSelf())
                {
                    // 3. process without privilege
                    bSuccess = DeleteFile(lpFileName);
                    dwError = GetLastError();
                    if(!bSuccess && dwError == ERROR_ACCESS_DENIED)
                    {
                        // failed with access denied; try with privilege
                        bHasRestorePrivilege = SetPrivilege(SE_RESTORE_NAME, SE_PRIVILEGE_ENABLED, &dwOldRestorePrivilege);
                        if(bHasRestorePrivilege)
                        {
                            // 4. process with privilege
                            bSuccess = DeleteFile(lpFileName);
                            dwError = GetLastError();
                            SetPrivilege(SE_RESTORE_NAME, dwOldRestorePrivilege, NULL);
                        }
                    }
                    SetThreadToken(NULL, hToken);
                }
                CloseHandle(hToken);
                hToken = NULL;
            }
        }
    }
    if(!bSuccess)
    {
        SetLastError(dwError);
    }
    return bSuccess;
}

So first it tries as the caller. If that fails with access denied, it temporarily enables privileges in the caller's token and tries again. If that fails with access denied and the caller is impersonating, it temporarily unimpersonates and tries again. If that fails with access denied, it temporarily enables privileges in the process token and tries again. I think this should handle pretty much any situation, but I was wondering if there was a better way to achieve this? There are a lot of operations that we would potentially want to use this method (i.e. pretty much any operation that accesses securable objects).

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Why not go straight to the last option? No exception handling and, if I read your explanation correctly, guaranteed to work. –  ChrisF Mar 17 '10 at 16:50
    
That doesn't handle the case where the process is running as LocalSystem (i.e. a service) and we need to read files on a network location (i.e. only the impersonated user account has access to the files). –  Luke Mar 17 '10 at 17:02
    
@Chris: It also goes against the mindset of least-privilege. You should only need as much privilege as necessary for that action, no more. It's the harder way to do things, but the more "ideal" way. –  Ioan Mar 17 '10 at 17:09
    
@Ioan - I hadn't thought of that. I suppose it depends on how likely it is that the early attempts will fail. –  ChrisF Mar 17 '10 at 22:07
    
You missed the readonly attribute flag :) –  ChristianWimmer Mar 17 '10 at 22:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

the only way you can do this is to run as a service, and impersonate the user from within the service. the service must be granted the impersonate privileve, which all services accounts are granted by default. when you impersonate the caller, you will probably have to impersonate for delegation so you can go off machine easily.

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Yes, that is how our service is structured. However, I can't control how 3rd parties will be using our DLL so I am trying to handle this in a generic manner. In my testing so far it seems to work well, although if the impersonated user is a standard user then their token doesn't have any useful privileges in it and that is a wasted step. Really the only reason we need to impersonate is to access network paths; maybe I could un-impersonate while trying to access local paths and re-impersonate while trying to access network paths. –  Luke Mar 24 '10 at 12:47

Backup and restore privilege together will provide full access to all files, full stop. These are available to LocalSystem. You must open files with FILE_FLAG_BACKUP_SEMANTICS to use this. Some Win32 APIs were not designed to be used with this and will not pass the flag on to the kernel, although in some of those cases you can use CreateFile to open the directory instead. (To the kernel, directories are just another kind of file).

If you really need to be able to access everything, I would say enable these privileges and do the scanning ops that should succeed regardless of the caller's security unimpersonated.

One outstanding issue is that the files could be locked or opened but not sharing access. There's no way to get around this from user mode (without killing the process that owns the resource, probably overkill). This is why the mainstream scanners I know of implement this function with a kernel mode filesystem filter driver.

Also, think about auditing: do you want audit entries to show up for LocalSystem or the user associated with the calling process?

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The problem is that I need access to network locations; LocalSystem doesn't have that access. Impersonation will also grant me access to the user's encrypted files, which LocalSystem also cannot access (at least not the decrypted contents). –  Luke Mar 18 '10 at 0:03

this all seems really funky for a DLL! this sounds like a job for a service rather than a DLL, or, if you're going to allow a user account to remove data put there by a privileged account, then why not simply set the ACL on the object that allows the delete operation?

With that said, what are you actually trying to do? A user account should not generally be able to remove data put there by an admininstrtive account!

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I agree with most of what you said, but it is beyond my control. This DLL is kind of a scanning component similar in concept to antivirus. In our product it runs as a service in LocalSystem context. However, the user can specify locations to scan; this can include network paths, which require impersonation to access. So at the start we impersonate the user then run the scan. If the user also wants to scan system paths (which maybe he doesn't have access to), we need to temporarily unimpersonate to access them. DeleteFile() was just one example; I could have used FindFirstFile() instead. –  Luke Mar 17 '10 at 21:10

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