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#!/bin/bash    

#become root
UID=$(id -u)
if [ x$UID != x0 ] 
then
    printf -v cmd_str '%q ' "$0" "$@"
    exec sudo su -c "$cmd_str"
fi


mkdir ~/.D3GO/; 
cp -a `pwd`/viewright_backup/. ~/.D3GO/;

mkdir /opt/D3GO/;
cp `pwd`/D3GO /opt/D3GO/;
cp `pwd`/D3GO.png /opt/D3GO/;
cp `pwd`/D3GO.desktop /usr/share/applications/;
chmod +x /opt/D3GO/D3GO;

As you can see, because this uses ~, and the script is ran as root, it creats the folder.D3GO in the /root/ directory. Is it possible to create it in the home directory. For example, if the script is located in /home/user/Downloads/, it should create the directory in home/user/. If it's located in /home/user2/Downloads/dir/, it should create it in /home/user2/ etc. Is this possible? Thanks!

Maybe something like:

#!/bin/bash    

#remember the username
user = $(whoami);

#become root
UID=$(id -u)
if [ x$UID != x0 ] 
then
    printf -v cmd_str '%q ' "$0" "$@"
    exec sudo su -c "$cmd_str"
fi


mkdir /home/`$user`/.D3GO/; 
cp -a `pwd`/viewright_backup/. /home/`$user`/.D3GO/;
share|improve this question
    
Why are you using su to install into the current user's home directory? –  Charles Duffy Jul 8 '14 at 21:51
    
Because I also need to access /usr/share/applications/ –  Dusan Milosevic Jul 8 '14 at 21:52
2  
Then you should escalate to root only for the part of the install for which you write to /usr/share/applications, not for all of it. Otherwise, you're creating files in a user's home directory they don't have permissions to write to -- and that's a good way to have angry users. –  Charles Duffy Jul 8 '14 at 21:53
    
By the way, sudo su is generally bad practice. sudo can do everything su can, so you don't need to use both together; most uses of sudo su can be replaced with sudo -i. –  Charles Duffy Jul 8 '14 at 21:55
    
you don't have to use `` if you are using $user. Just say /home/$user/.D3GO - I would also suggest to use $USER for setting user variable. –  Arun Sangal Jul 8 '14 at 21:56

2 Answers 2

if [ "$UID" != 0 ] 
then
    printf -v set_home_prefix 'HOME=%q; ' "$HOME"
    printf -v cmd_str '%q ' "$0" "$@"
    exec sudo su -c "$set_home_prefix $cmd_str"
fi

I took the liberty of correcting the invalid quoting you were given in the answer you accepted on the other question.

share|improve this answer

To answer your question literally:

sudo -E preserves environment variables (although some variables may be overwritten by the new shell).

export MY_HOME=$HOME
. . .

exec sudo -E su -c "$cmd_str"

Then you can reference $MY_HOME in the script and it should be set to the original user's $HOME.

But I agree with the comment from @CharlesDuffy, you should sudo for individual commands you need to run. If you do that, then arguments to the sudo command are substituted from the original shell.

For example:

sudo cp -a `pwd`/viewright_backup/. $HOME/.D3GO/;

This uses the non-root user's $HOME, because the variable substitution happens before the sudo command is executed.

share|improve this answer
    
...or sudo MY_HOME="$HOME" ..., which explicitly exports a specific variable. –  Charles Duffy Jul 8 '14 at 21:57
    
@CharlesDuffy, yes good point, he may not want to export all env variables. –  Bill Karwin Jul 8 '14 at 21:58

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