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I would like to pass an array as an argument with many values as possible for this method. For example, if I entered [1,2,3] into add([1,2,3], I should receive the sum value of the array.

def add(a, b)
    a + b
end

def subtract(a, b)
a - b
end

Since I am new to Ruby, I am not sure how to go about this. Can someone please explain.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looking at your earlier question, I'm guessing you want to be able to distinguish between array arguments and numeric arguments. Try using the kind_of? method and branching based on the result. See this question for other advice (using the responds_to? method is more idiomatic).

def add(val)
  if (val.kind_of?(Array))
    # add each element
  else
    @result += val
  end
end

To do the addition, you'll want to use the each method to perform an action for every element of the array.

val.each do |x|
  @result += x
end
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2  
Why bother with the kind_of?, just go straight for if val.respond_to? :each –  iain Jul 9 '14 at 0:01
    
@iain No. I would use #instance_of?.. There are lots who can respond to #each.. Or, You can either do respond_to?(:to_ary)... #kind_of for kindness and #instance_of? for strictness.. :-) It is up to you what you want to be.. Loll. –  Arup Rakshit Jul 9 '14 at 10:26
1  
Yeah, I wanted to answer the question literally just in case visBar later wanted to distinguish between other collections. You wouldn't want to do the same kind of each over an array and a hash. –  Andrew Piliser Jul 9 '14 at 16:02
    
@ArupRakshit There are lots that can respond to each, so document the default usage (for an Array-like collection) and let the method take a block too, the caller should know what it's passing. Use instance_of for something like this in a codebase I'm responsible for and you wouldn't get past a code review ;) –  iain Jul 10 '14 at 0:04

The usual way of doing this is to pass a variable number of arguments, which I assume from your question are Numeric:

def add_em_up(*args)
  args.reduce(:+)
end

add_em_up(1,2,3,4)    #=> 10
add_em_up(1,2,3.5,4)  #=> 10.5
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+1 for #reduce and +1 for Greedy operator. It is really greedy..Huhh.. :-) –  Arup Rakshit Jul 9 '14 at 10:23
    
I find this a bit amusing. 18 hours after posting I've received 10 upvotes for an answer that falls somewhat short of, let's say, "mind-bending", yet many brilliant contributions I've made in the past have yet to earn a single +1. I guess that's just life at SO. –  Cary Swoveland Jul 9 '14 at 18:05
    
I agree, It is SO life :-) –  Arup Rakshit Jul 9 '14 at 18:10

I think Andrew's post is fine but you're more likely to see the is_a method like this:

def add(val)
  if val.is_a?(Array)
    do something
  else
    @result += val
  end
end
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