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how can I programm with the "at" command that below runs at 6:00,7.00,8:00,9:00,10:00 until 23.00

cmd = "echo /bin/everyhour | at 06:00"

regards gwaag

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2  
search cron job –  kamesh Jul 9 at 4:42
    
Why you add python tag? –  Avinash Raj Jul 9 at 4:45
    
@kamesh haha it might be a better option but I'm actual curious as to what the exact answer is to this question is! (I was actually wondering how the bash "at" works last night!) –  James Bedford Jul 9 at 4:46
    
@AvinashRaj Yea seems like it wants the "bash" tag. –  James Bedford Jul 9 at 4:46
    
possible duplicate of How can I make a bash command run periodically? –  Alexandre Santos Jul 9 at 5:08

2 Answers 2

The at command is used to schedule commands to be executed once. For recurring executions I would suggest cron. Edit your crontab with crontab -e and add the follow line:

00 06-23 * * * /bin/everyhour
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You can try putting this in your .bashrc, not tested though:

doer() {
  t=$(date +"%k")
  bin/everyhour
  if [[ $t < 24 && $t > 5 ]]; then
      echo doer | at now + 1 hour
  fi  
}
doer

or, this one keeps on working but only executes on specified interval:

doer() {
  t=$(date +"%k")
  if [[ $t < 24 && $t > 5 ]]; then
      bin/everyhour
  fi  
  echo doer | at now + 1 hour
}
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You might want to test this. I don't think aliases are passed through to at. –  John C Jul 9 at 5:26
    
@JohnC: It's a function, not an alias. But you're right that at won't be able to see it. More to the point, the solution to this problem is cron, not at –  rici Jul 9 at 5:29
    
@JohnC, yes it is a function but same can be achieved via a script in bin for example. And surely cron is the right tool. –  perreal Jul 9 at 5:31

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