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Hey guys, so here's the deal.

I have several databases (SqlServer 2005) on the same server with the same schema but different data.

I have one extra database which has one table storing the names of the mentioned databases.

So what I need to do is to iterate over those databases name and actually "switch" to each one (use [dbname]) and execute a T-SQL script. Am I clear?

Let me give you an example (simplified from the real one):

CREATE TABLE DatabaseNames
(
   Id   int,
   Name varchar(50)
)
INSERT INTO DatabaseNames SELECT 'DatabaseA'
INSERT INTO DatabaseNames SELECT 'DatabaseB'
INSERT INTO DatabaseNames SELECT 'DatabaseC'

Assume that DatabaseA, DatabaseB and DatabaseC are real existing databases. So let's say I need to create a new SP on those DBs. I need some script that loops over those databases and executes the T-SQL script I specify (maybe stored on a varchar variable or wherever).

Any ideas?

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess this will generally not be possible in TSQL, since, as others pointed out,

  • you first need as USE statement to change the database,

  • followed by the statement you want to execute, which is, although not specified, a DDL statement which must be first in a batch.

  • Moreover, you cannot have a GO in a string to be EXECuted.

I found a command-line solution invoking sqlcmd:

for /f "usebackq" %i in 
    (`sqlcmd -h -1 -Q 
     "set nocount on select name from master..sysdatabases where status=16"`)
    do
        sqlcmd -d %i -Q "print db_name()"

Sample code uses current Windows login to query all active databases from Master (replace with your own connection and query for databases), and executes a literal TSQL command on each database thus found. (line breaks for clarity only)

Have a look at the command-line parameters of sqlcmd. You can pass it a TSQL file as well.

If you want to allow manual selection of databases, have a look at SSMS Tools Pack.

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Thanks! I didn't know about the SSMS Tool Pack. I'm going to try it, since it's the simplest way to do it without much effort. –  emzero Mar 17 '10 at 20:25
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The simplest way is this:

DECLARE @stmt nvarchar(200)
DECLARE c CURSOR LOCAL FORWARD_ONLY FOR SELECT 'USE [' + Name + ']' FROM DatabaseNames
OPEN c
WHILE 1 <> 0 BEGIN
    FETCH c INTO @stmt
    IF @@fetch_status <> 0 BREAK
    SET @stmt = @stmt + ' ' + @what_you_want_to_do
    EXEC(@stmt)
END
CLOSE c
DEALLOCATE c

However, obviously it will not work for statements that need to be the first statement in a batch, like CREATE PROCEDURE. For that you can use SQLCLR. Create and deploy a class like this:

public class StoredProcedures {
    [SqlProcedure(Name="exec_in_db")]
    public static void ExecInDb(string dbname, string sql) {
        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("context connection=true")) {
            conn.Open();
            using (SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand()) {
                cmd.CommandText = "USE [" + dbname + "]";
                cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                cmd.CommandText = sql;
                cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
        }
    }
}

Then you can do

DECLARE @db_name nvarchar(200)
DECLARE c CURSOR LOCAL FORWARD_ONLY FOR SELECT Name FROM DatabaseNames
OPEN c
WHILE 1 <> 0 BEGIN
    FETCH c INTO @@db_name
    IF @@fetch_status <> 0 BREAK
    EXEC exec_in_db @db_name, @what_you_want_to_do
END
CLOSE c
DEALLOCATE c
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Thanks, but it's not working. I mean, it's not switching to the databases, it's executing what I write on "-- Do whatever you want" several times on the same DB (the one that has the DatabaseNames table) –  emzero Mar 17 '10 at 19:25
    
This won't work. PER MSDN entry on the EXEC statement "Changes in database context last only until the end of the EXECUTE statement." –  JohnFx Mar 17 '10 at 19:25
    
Cursors are usually bad, but sometimes necessary (like in this example) +1 for that. @emzero + JohnFx - The reason this isn't working is because you will need to tack on your statement to the @stmt variable and exec() them as a batch. –  StingyJack Mar 17 '10 at 19:26
    
I've done something similar to this for processing a bunch of tables. –  Bratch Mar 17 '10 at 19:28
    
@StingyJack: I'm aware that the SQL to execute needs to be inside the EXEC statement, see my answer to the question below that uses that method. –  JohnFx Mar 17 '10 at 19:38
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You should be able to do this with the sp_MSforeachdb undocumented stored procedure.

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This gives no control over which DBs are executed against. –  Joe Mar 17 '10 at 19:14
    
Sure it does! You just need to use the DB_NAME() builtin function in whatever query you are using. You can use it to exclude certain databases, or include them, depending on which is more suitable for the application. –  mwigdahl Mar 17 '10 at 19:47
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This method requires you to put your SQL script to be executed on each DB in a variable, but should work.

DECLARE @SQLcmd varchar(MAX)
SET @SQLcmd ='Your SQL Commands here'

DECLARE @dbName nvarchar(200)
DECLARE c CURSOR LOCAL FORWARD_ONLY FOR SELECT dbName FROM DatabaseNames
OPEN c
WHILE 1 <> 0 BEGIN
    FETCH c INTO @dbName 
    IF @@fetch_status <> 0 BREAK
    EXEC('USE [' + @dbName + '] ' + @SQLcmd )
END
CLOSE c

Also, as some have pointed out. This approach is problematic if you want to run a command that needs to be the only thing in a batch.

Here is an alternative for that situation, but it requires more permissions than many DBA's might want you to have and requires you to put your SQL into a separate text file.

DECLARE c CURSOR LOCAL FORWARD_ONLY FOR SELECT dbName FROM DatabaseNames
OPEN c
WHILE 1 <> 0 BEGIN
    FETCH c INTO @dbName 
    IF @@fetch_status <> 0 BREAK
     exec master.dbo.xp_cmdshell 'osql -E -S '+ @@SERVERNAME + ' -d ' + @dbName + '  -i c:\test.sql'
END
CLOSE c
DEALLOCATE c
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Won't work. 1: There is no such statement as CREATE STORED PROCEDURE 2: CREATE PROCEDURE needs to be the first statement in a batch. –  erikkallen Mar 17 '10 at 19:43
    
Fixed answer to include a method that will work with things that need to be in their own batch. –  JohnFx Mar 17 '10 at 20:08
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Use the USE command and repeat your commands

Ps. Have a look at how to use USE with a parameter here

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1  
How can I use the USE command with a literal string from a result set? I mean I have the DB names on a varchar column. –  emzero Mar 17 '10 at 19:13
    
@emzero, see my edit above but make sure you validate your input! –  CResults Mar 17 '10 at 19:18
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