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I have two entities in a many-to-many relationship: A Map which can have many Tags (and a Tag in turn can be used by many Maps).

I'm trying to update a parent Map entity, including removing items from its child Tags collection. While the Map entity is honoring changes in the database changes to the Tags collection are never honored (apart from the initial creation of them). Any ideas what I'm doing wrong?

In the database are 3 tables:

  • Map
  • Tag
  • MapTags

The entity classes:

public class Map
{
    public Map()
    {
        Tags = new List<Tag>();
    }

    public string Id { get; set; }
    ...
    public ICollection<Tag> Tags { get; set; }
}

public class Tag
{
    public Tag()
    {
        Maps = new List<Map>();
    }

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Text { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Map> Maps { get; set; }
}

And the EF6 mappings:

public class MapMap : EntityTypeConfiguration<Map>
{
    public MapMap()
    {
        // Primary Key
        this.HasKey(t => new { t.Id });

        // Properties

        this.Property(t => t.Id)
            .IsRequired()
            .HasMaxLength(32);

        ...

        this.ToTable("Map");
        this.Property(t => t.Id).HasColumnName("Id");
        ...

        // Relationships

        this.HasMany(m => m.Tags)
            .WithMany(t => t.Maps)
            .Map(m =>
            {
                m.MapLeftKey("MapId");
                m.MapRightKey("MapTagId");
                m.ToTable("MapTags");
            });
    }
}

public class TagMap : EntityTypeConfiguration<Tag>
{
    public TagMap()
    {
        // Primary Key
        this.HasKey(t => new { t.Id });

        // Properties

        this.Property(t => t.Id)
            .HasDatabaseGeneratedOption(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity);

        this.Property(t => t.Text)
            .IsRequired()
            .HasMaxLength(256);

        // Table & Column Mappings

        this.ToTable("Tag");
        this.Property(t => t.Id).HasColumnName("Id");
        this.Property(t => t.Text).HasColumnName("Text");

        // Relationships

        this.HasMany(t => t.Maps)
            .WithMany(m => m.Tags)
            .Map(m =>
            {
                m.MapLeftKey("TagId");
                m.MapRightKey("MapId");
                m.ToTable("MapTags");
            });
    }
}

Code to update a Map's Tags:

map.Tags = new List<Tag>();
foreach (string item in data.tags)
{
    Tag tag = MapRepository.FindTagByText(item);
    if (tag == null)
    {
        try
        {
            tag = WebMapRepository.CreateTag(new Tag()
                {
                    Text = item
                });
        }
        catch (DbEntityValidationException ex)
        {
            DisplayValidationErrors(ex, "Tag [" + item + "] validation errors:");
            throw; // Abort
        }
    }
    map.Tags.Add(tag);
}

And the DAL code updating the Map:

public static Map UpdateMap(Map map)
{
    using (MapContext context = new MapContext())
    {
        context.Maps.Attach(map);
        context.Entry(map).State = EntityState.Modified;
        context.SaveChanges();
        return GetMap(map.Id);
    }
}

Workaround While I'd prefer a more elegant solution, for now I'm just running SQL directly to refresh my relationships manually.

share|improve this question
2  
Dealing with detached entities and relationship can be tricky. I would try to add/modify the tags collection while the map is attached. –  TheVedge Jul 14 at 1:31
    
@TheVedge - Thanks, but trying to keep separation of concerns. –  Gavin Jul 17 at 0:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Looking at your code within UpdateMap it looks like you are working in a disconnected scenario?

If so, reattaching entities in a disconnected scenario has two steps:

  1. Reattach the entity graph to the context so that it is tracked
  2. Set the state for each entity in the graph

Setting the EntityState to Modified on the root Map entity will attach all entities in the object graph to the context. However, it will mark all child Tag entities with the Unchanged state. This would correspond to your comment that changes to the Map entity are being persisted, but changes to the Tag collection are not.

The solution to this will very much depend on the architecture of you application. One potential solution would be to get the corresponding Map entity from the database and then walk its object graph against the updated map and paint its state accordingly.

The following example shows tags in the collection of the queried map entity that are not in the tag collection of the disconnected map having their relationship with the map removed:

public static Map UpdateMap(Map map)
{
    // get map in its current state
    var previousMap = context.Maps
       .Where(m => m.Id == map.Id)
       .Include(m => m.Tags)
       .Single();

    // work out tags deleted in the updated map
    var deletedTags = previousMap.Tags.Except(map.Tags).ToList();

    // remove the references to removed tags
    deletedTags.ForEach(t => previousMap.Tags.Remove(t));

    // .. deal with added tags
    // very similar code to deleted so not showing

    context.SaveChanges();
}

For this to work, your Tag type will need to implement IEquatable<Tag> to allow the Except operation on the set to work correctly (as it is a reference type).

NOTE Ive used HashSets instead of as in the question where Lists but thats just an implementation detail.

E.g.

   public class Tag : IEquatable<Tag>
    {
        public Tag()
        {
            Maps = new HashSet<Map>();
        }

        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Text { get; set; }
        public virtual ISet<Map> Maps { get; private set; }

        public bool Equals(Tag other)
        {
            if (ReferenceEquals(null, other)) return false;
            if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;
            return Id == other.Id;
        }

        public override bool Equals(object obj)
        {
            if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false;
            if (ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) return true;
            if (obj.GetType() != GetType()) return false;
            return Equals((Tag) obj);
        }

        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return Id;
        }

        public static bool operator ==(Tag left, Tag right)
        {
            return Equals(left, right);
        }

        public static bool operator !=(Tag left, Tag right)
        {
            return !Equals(left, right);
        }
    }

I'll get the test project up on GitHub.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion - very much appreciated! You are correct, I'm working in a disconnected scenario to separate concerns. I'm finding when I set tags removed from the map as "Deleted" I get the following error - The DELETE statement conflicted with the REFERENCE constraint "FK_MapTags_Tag". The conflict occurred in database "MyDbName", table "dbo.MapTags", column 'MapTagId'. The statement has been terminated. - I guess this is because the code is trying to delete the tag itself rather than the relationship? –  Gavin Jul 16 at 21:32
    
Apologies - looks like my code sample is deleting the tags as opposed to the references to the tags. I'll update it shortly. –  LongboatHarry Jul 16 at 21:48
    
To use ForEach I have to use ToList - deletedTags.ForEach(t => previousMap.Tags.Remove(t)); (mentioned in-case it's relevant)- but this still doesn't remove any relationships I'm afraid. Thanks for the suggestion though. I'm wondering if it's because the Tags themselves have old versions of the map in their own children and so the changes get undone? I'm seeing a lot of duplicate relationships in my MapTags table, so suggests something unexpected is happening. –  Gavin Jul 16 at 22:33
    
Yeah - I had missed the ToList() so you are right to add it. Could well be a data issue so probably worth retesting after manually removing duplicates. Let me know if you get any further as very interested to hear the solution. Thanks –  LongboatHarry Jul 17 at 8:08
    
Shouldn't the previousMap be filtered with Single or SingleOrDefault as there should only be one map with that ID. second the previousMap.Tags.Remove(t) will do nothing as the object t will be different from the one on the Tags list. –  Pedro.The.Kid Jul 17 at 9:50

You issue is you are managing the collection manually and detached from the context, this is a side effect of the repository pattern and it is why many say it is an anti-pattern.

  1. Try to remove the new list and the constructor and make the ICollection virtual.
  2. since tag has a id match the tag on the map by id and not by text
  3. your update map is attaching the map see if attaching the tags solves the issue.
  4. I don't know because I make the configurations on the context but you should only need to map the many to many relation on one of the entities.

I think all your issues are because you are using the repository pattern and I always avoid it because it creates more problems that it solves, this is just my opinion, and many specialists disagree.

share|improve this answer
1  
anti pattern ? I use Repository pattern with attach and setState methods. How is that an anti pattern. no down vote, but I think you miss the point that dealing with the Graph and expectations people have with the context is more the issue. If you load the Full graph into the context and set the state to those that are logically new or updated appropriately, it will work fine. The repository pattern just hides the underlying provider allow that be switched in the future. Please explain why the repository pattern is an anti pattern. –  phil soady Jul 16 at 9:59
    
Good point about having repository methods to reattach entity graphs –  LongboatHarry Jul 16 at 10:42
    
@philsoady If you read the answer I say "many say it is an anti-pattern" and in the end "...this is just my opinion, and many specialists disagree." this implies that there is controversy on the subject and that it is only my opinion. read more in here ayende.com/blog/3955/repository-is-the-new-singleton –  Pedro.The.Kid Jul 16 at 10:54
    
thx for link... summary, small expense for overhead and people misuse it. I think most patterns have been poorly applied at sometime. easy to forget that without using the repository pattern, you might end up with references to Nhibernate or EntitiyFramework in your core / Domain layer. –  phil soady Jul 16 at 13:41
    
what I use is a IOC container (Unity) with an interface to the Entity Framework context this is considered by some as a repository pattern because the context can be considered a generic repository. –  Pedro.The.Kid Jul 16 at 13:48

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