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I came across a conditional if statement in Objective-C:

self.frontCardView = self.backCardView;
if ((self.backCardView = [self popPersonViewWithFrame:[self backCardViewFrame]])) {
    // Fade the back card into view.
    ...
}

Basically:

if ((self.backCardView = self.popPersonViewWithFrame(self.backCardViewFrame()))) {...}

This sets "self.backCardView" to the return value of "-popPersonViewWithFrame:". In C (and Objective-C), the result of an assignment is the assigned value.

In this case, the result of the expression "(self.backCardView = [self popPersonViewWithFrame:self.backCardViewFrame])" the return value of "-popPersonViewWithFrame:".

If the return value is "nil", then the conditional is not executed (since "nil" is a false value).

If I try to do the same thing in Swift:

self.frontCardView = self.backCardView
if ((self.backCardView = self.popPersonViewWithFrame(self.backCardViewFrame()))) {
    // Fade the back card into view.
    ...
}

I get an error in compilation:

Type '()' does not conform to protocol 'LogicValue'

share|improve this question
1  
just put assignment outside the condition – Bryan Chen Jul 10 '14 at 3:09
    
Why the double parens around the condition? – NRitH Jul 10 '14 at 3:10
    
@NRitH: Because they're absolutely irrelevant. – gotnull Jul 10 '14 at 3:12
1  
I don't know anything about Swift but if this was C#-like (in that you need to have a bool not an integer or integer-ish value) you'd be trying to do something like if ((a = b) != nil) { ... Better yet don't let your if statements have side-effects. – ta.speot.is Jul 10 '14 at 3:15
1  
(self.backCardView = self.popPersonViewWithFrame(self.backCardViewFrame())) that is not a logic value, you need to use some comparison operator here, like e.g. (self.backCardView = self.popPersonViewWithFrame(self.backCardViewFrame())) == nil or something. that will conform the LogicValue protocol. – holex Jul 10 '14 at 8:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assign, then check for nil separately.

self.frontCardView = self.backCardView
self.backCardView = self.popPersonViewWithFrame(self.backCardViewFrame())
if self.backCardView != nil {
    // Fade the back card into view.
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer

Swift was specifically designed to not allow testing an assignment in a conditional for safety reasons (people accidentally using one = instead of two). The result of an assignment operator is always void () like the error says.

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() is simply a typealias for void, which is what assignments return in Swift. As Bryan suggested, just put the assignment outside of the condition.

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The condition isn't a condition, so like Bryan Chen said, do the assignment outside of the condition, but assign it to another variable. In the condition, then, check whether that variable is equal to backCardView, like so:

frontCardView = backCardView
let poppedView = self.popPersonViewWithFrame(self.backCardViewFrame())
if backCardView == poppedView {
    // Fade the back card into view.
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
See, that's what I tried earlier and it's not actually meeting the same condition that it does in Objective-C. – gotnull Jul 10 '14 at 3:29

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