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I created a SETTINGS object as a namedtuple thinking that the list contained inside would be immutable. I was incorrect, as through the whole chain only the reference to the original list inside an entirely-mutable dict is used.

Thus, when I call .pop() on my list, it also removes it from my not-as-immutable-as-I-thought namedtuple. Now I understand after some time in #python why this is all happening.

What I would like to know is: how can I create that SETTINGS namedtuple as the end of the line? Just data, without references to any other objects, in a nicely-user-editable way? I feel the dict is the easiest data structure to read/edit by humans, hence my unpacking of the dict into the namedtuple.

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>>
>>> _settings = {
...     'ROOM_NAMES': [
...         'Master Bedroom',
...         'Bath',
...         'Kitchen',
...         'Study',
...     ],
... }
>>> _Settings = namedtuple('_Settings', [k for k in _settings.keys()])
>>> SETTINGS = _Settings(**_settings)
>>>
>>> names = SETTINGS.ROOM_NAMES
>>> names
['Master Bedroom', 'Bath', 'Kitchen', 'Study']
>>> type(names)
<class 'list'>
>>> # POP 'Study' OFF OF THE LIST
>>> name = names.pop() 
>>>
>>> # THIS IS WHAT I EXPECT              
>>> name in names                    
False
>>>
>>> # MISSING HERE AS THIS IS THE END OF THE LINE
>>> name in _settings['ROOM_NAMES']  
False
>>>
>>> # MISSING HERE FROM MY NAMEDTUPLE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE LINE
>>> name in SETTINGS.ROOM_NAMES      
False
>>>
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1 Answer 1

I think you're confused about how tuples actually work. Even 'real' tuples don't make the contained objects immutable, just the tuple itself:

>>> x  = [1,2,3]
>>> t = (x,0,3)
>>> t[0].append(4)
>>> t
([1, 2, 3, 4], 0, 3)

What I guess you want to do is .copy() the list before you start mutating it.

>>> a = x.copy()
>>> t = (a,0,1)
>>> t[0].append(5)
>>> t
([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 0, 1)
>>> x
[1, 2, 3, 4]
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