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For below, why does the last one return a nil? Function "some" doesn't work on list of lists?

(some #(= % 1) '(1 3)     )  ; ==> true
(some #(= % '(1 3)) ['(1 3) '(1 2 3)]    )  ; ==> true
(some #(= % '(1 3)) '('(1 3) '(1 2 3))   )  ;==> nil 
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2  
'(1 3) =/= '(quote (1 3)) –  dsm Jul 10 '14 at 3:37
1  
Have a look at Replace elements in nested quoted lists adds new elements?. The symptoms are different in that case, but the explanation of what '(... '(...) ...) means is what you need, and it's included there. –  Joshua Taylor Jul 10 '14 at 12:22
1  
Also, try (note double quotation): (some #(= % ''(1 3)) '('(1 3) '(1 2 3))). –  Joshua Taylor Jul 10 '14 at 14:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You should modify the expression like this:

(some #(= % '(1 3)) '((1 3) (1 2 3))   )
=> true

You already quoted the list by using ', you don't need to quote again in the quoted list.

You can easily check what happened in REPL:

user=> '((1 3) (1 2 3))
((1 3) (1 2 3))
user=> '('(1 3) '(1 2 3))
((quote (1 3)) (quote (1 2 3)))
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As ntalbs points out, the issue here is double quoting. It may be a better idea to use vectors instead of lists, or build lists with list. Both would save you some confusion and vectors have different performance characteristics (near constant random access time).

(some #(= % '(1 3)) [[1 3] [1 2 3]])
(some #(= % '(1 3)) (list (list 1 3) (list 1 2 3)))
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Thanks, but why does (= [1 3]'(1 3)) evaluate to true? Vector same as list?? –  Kevin Zhu Jul 11 '14 at 9:08
2  
Because they're both sequences. Docs for = say: "Same as Java x.equals(y) except it also works for nil, and compares numbers and collections in a type-independent manner" –  Konrad Garus Jul 11 '14 at 9:55

@Kevin

I see @ntalbs answered but I am in the habit of testing various timings. You may be curious to note the time difference I observed:

(time (some #{'(1 3)} '((1 3) (1 2 3))))      ;0.073
(time (some #(= % '(1 3)) '((1 3) (1 2 3))))  ;0.632

(time (nil? (some #{'(1 3)} '((1 3) (1 2 3)))))     ;0.068
(time (nil? (some #(= % '(1 3)) '((1 3) (1 2 3))))) ;0.628

If you are processing large amounts of data this may be a useful knowledge

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Thanks @Frank! This is quite useful. What would be the rational for using "nil? " as part of function? I don't see much performance difference on my machine. –  Kevin Zhu Jul 11 '14 at 9:21
    
Got it! "nil?" returns true or false –  Kevin Zhu Jul 25 '14 at 3:29

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