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Here is my code, I'm getting commas in between my names in the message returned

CodePen: Celebrity Name Revealer

var MarilynMonroe=["Norma", "Jean", "Mortensen"];
var WoodyAllen=["Allen", "Konigsberg"];
var MegRyan=["Margaret", "Mary", "Emily", "Anne Hyra"];

function nameMaker () {
    msg = "The name is ";
    for (i=0; i<arguments.length; i++){
        msg += arguments[i] + " ";
    }
    return(msg);
}

console.log(nameMaker(MarilynMonroe));
console.log(nameMaker(WoodyAllen));
console.log(nameMaker(MegRyan));

I was hoping to have a space between them, but if you change the space in the string I added to lets say an exclamation point you will see that it just appends that to the end of the entire phrase and that confuses me as well.

I have created a code pen.

CodePen: Celebrity Name Revealer


I ended up with the following solution for this question:

var MarilynMonroe=["Norma", "Jean", "Mortensen"];
var WoodyAllen=["Allen", "Konigsberg"];
var MegRyan=["Margaret", "Mary", "Emily", "Anne Hyra"];

function nameRevealer (names) {
    msg = "This celebrity's real name is ";
    for (i=0; i<names.length; i++){
        msg += names[i] + " ";
    }
    return(msg);
}

console.log(nameMaker(MarilynMonroe));
console.log(nameMaker(WoodyAllen));
console.log(nameMaker(MegRyan));
share|improve this question
3  
arguments is an array like object of the arguments you pass to the function. In this case, you only ever pass 1 argument (the array). Add a parameter names in the function and then change arguments to names – Evan Trimboli Jul 10 '14 at 5:35
    
Ok, but do you think you could expand on the reason why a little better in an answer. Your right that does work, but I have to be able to explain why it is and frankly I'm still a little unsure. – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:37
    
Compare how the function runs between what you have and what I suggested. Use the debugger to step through it. It should be pretty obvious to figure out the difference. – Evan Trimboli Jul 10 '14 at 5:40
    
Ok, I will do that. Thank Evan! – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The arguments variable is an array: you are passing an array as the first argument. What is happening is that it is iterating the arguments array, and calling .toString() on each celebrity's array, which automatically adds the commas. What you want is to iterate arguments[0].

Something like:

for (var i=0; i < arguments[0].length; i++) {
    msg += arguments[0][i] + " ";
}
share|improve this answer
    
It would be cleaner to just take the arguments by name, no? – Michael Aaron Safyan Jul 10 '14 at 5:40
    
@MichaelAaronSafyan Agreed. But OP's question was why he was getting the commas. There could be quite a few improvements to the celebrity name revealer, I think. – bozdoz Jul 10 '14 at 5:41
1  
This is what I needed to hear. THis explains to me why I was getting the commas. You rock and now I understand! – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:43
1  
Thanks for the praise @EricB! :) – bozdoz Jul 10 '14 at 5:43
1  
I have been thrusted into teaching a JS class and If I don't know the reason why,.. I can't create the examples or explain them in great detail when something goes wrong. I appreciate you understanding what I was asking and hitting the nail on the head! – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:44

The arguments is an array of arrays (with just one item) in this case. To fix this, redefine nameMaker:

var nameMaker = function(names) {
  return 'The name is ' + names.join(' ');
};

Also, some other feedback regarding your code:

  1. You should always declare variables with "var"; the way you are defining "msg" and "i" cause them to be global variables since you do not use "var".
  2. When constructing a string by repeated iteration, it is typically faster to use a list as a builder and then use the 'join' function (if you are only concatenating a small, fixed number of strings, though, it's fine to simply use '+'; however, if you are doing += in a for-loop, switch to 'push' and 'join').
share|improve this answer
    
Damn, why did I do it the long way, that makes more sense. To use the join. – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:40
    
You would have had to see the code building up to this. I was teaching about passing arrays into functions and iterating through them. Listen I'm not the greatest JavaScript teacher. But I am trying. I may actually use what you suggested as an alternate way of doing the same thing in a more efficient manner. I'll test it out. – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:50
    
@EricB, it's generally a good idea to teach by example. So, if you do use "arguments" instead of passing the arguments by name, you should use it in a case where they cannot be passed by name (e.g. when the same function may be invoked with many different variations in the number of type of arguments). And definitely follow items #1 and #2. – Michael Aaron Safyan Jul 10 '14 at 5:53
    
Makes sense. I have a lot of notes to take away form this! – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:55
    
#1. yes because of function scope vs global scope. Point taken! #2. I hadn't covered joins yet at this point. But I think I may move that ahead in the course so that I can use it here or use this example as a reason to segway into join method. Great comments! – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:59

Check out this fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/JayKandari/xdNLj I just replicated yours in fiddle with a little change. Is that you wanted? a space between those names ?

    var MarilynMonroe=["Norma", "Jean", "Mortensen"];
    var WoodyAllen=["Allen", "Konigsberg"];
    var MegRyan=["Margaret", "Mary", "Emily", "Anne Hyra"];

    function nameMaker (names) {
        msg = "The name is ";
        for (i=0; i<names.length; i++){
            msg += names[i] + " ";
        }
        document.getElementById("message").innerText = (msg);
            return(msg);
    }

nameMaker(MarilynMonroe);
nameMaker(WoodyAllen);
nameMaker(MegRyan);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is the correct solution to the overall problem, but the answer I was looking for was more of an explanation as to why I was getting the output with the commas. I did 1up your answer though! – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:52

Javascript already takes arguments as array, so you don't need to pass an array.

call your function like this.

console.log(nameMaker("Norma", "Jean", "Mortensen"));

OR

change your function add a paramenter names and perform operation on names instead of arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so this works, but I want to be able to pass in the celebrity name or name of the array that contains the real name to get the answer. The first comment I received was right on but Im unsure why I got the commas and the space didn't get applied. – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:39
1  
The commas are from an implicit conversion from array to string. There is only one item in "arguments", namely the array that you passed-in. So your loop executes only once. It then does "+=" with a string on the left and an array on the right. The array on the right is converted to a string, and the string representation of an array is the elements converted to strings and comma-separated. – Michael Aaron Safyan Jul 10 '14 at 5:42
    
Nice explanation! ALready have a correct answer with a similar explanation, but I thank you for the detailed explanation! This helps me! – Eric B Jul 10 '14 at 5:54

Add an argument variable function nameMaker (name) then change all argument to name

var MarilynMonroe=["Norma", "Jean", "Mortensen"];
var WoodyAllen=["Allen", "Konigsberg"];
var MegRyan=["Margaret", "Mary", "Emily", "Anne Hyra"];

function nameMaker (name) {
    msg = "The name is ";
    for (i=0; i<name.length; i++){
        msg += name[i] + " ";
    }
    return(msg);
}
console.log(nameMaker(MarilynMonroe));
console.log(nameMaker(WoodyAllen));
console.log(nameMaker(MegRyan));
share|improve this answer

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